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Telemedicine Effective in Delivering International Cardiac Care, Children’s Hospital Study Shows

PITTSBURGH, July 22, 2014 – After studying more than 1,000 pediatric consultations offered in Latin America through telemedicine, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC found that physicians in those countries were highly satisfied with Children’s service and believed telemedicine had improved patient outcomes.

The study, led by Ricardo A. Muñoz, M.D., FAAP, FCCM, FACC, chief, Cardiac Intensive Care Division, at Children’s, was published online in the July issue of Telemedicine and e-Health.

“Lack of skilled physicians is a widespread problem, particularly those with expertise in patients with complex medical problems, such as congenital heart disease,” said Dr. Muñoz, also medical director, Global Business and Telemedicine, at Children’s. “The use of telemedicine services within pediatric cardiac intensive care units (CICUs) can be used as an assisting technology, allowing more expertise and knowledge to be shared with remote centers in need.”

Although a growing body of evidence suggests that telemedicine is associated with improved patient outcomes, the technology remains a relatively new tool in health care, particularly in pediatric critical care. In surveying the Latin American centers, the Children’s researchers hope to design a common approach for future tele-consultations.

“Little is known about the optimal method of telemedicine service delivery in the international setting,” said Dr. Muñoz. “Ideally, a consistent approach should be used for centers with similar organizations, skill level and patient populations. One size does not fit all.”

The study showcased Children’s unusual multicenter experience in telemedicine at three hospitals in Colombia and one in Mexico from July 2011 to June 2013. Children’s physicians provided 1,040 consultations for 476 patients, with a real-time intervention taking place in 23 percent of those encounters, including echocardiography, adjustment of pacemaker settings and pharmacologic therapy. In 6 percent of the tele-consultations, a different diagnosis was suggested based on the interpretation of cardiac or imaging studies.

The number and type of patients seen by Children’s e-CICU were selected by local physicians at each hospital. Although Children’s physicians in Pittsburgh did not have remote access to the children’s electronic medical records, relevant patient data was provided in a secure database and telemedicine hardware was used for real-time consultations. A CICU physician from Children’s participated in all the encounters, with some being joined by other specialists, including cardiac surgeons and neonatal intensivists.

Based on anonymous surveys of physicians participating at the international centers, 96 percent of respondents reported being satisfied or highly satisfied with the telemedicine service, while 58 percent rated the promptness and time dedicated by the tele-intensivist as very high. Physicians reported that they changed their clinical practice sometimes in relation to the telemedicine encounters, with changes in surgical management noted most frequently.

“We know that telemedicine-assisted pediatric cardiac critical care is technologically and logistically feasible in the international arena,” said Dr. Muñoz. “And now we know that the physicians we assist internationally consider this technology to be useful for patient outcomes and education. With continuing improvements in telemedicine technology and our own practices, we will continue to expand access to the world’s best health care for children around the world.”

Children’s Hospital is leading the way in the development of telemedicine services to meet the needs of young patients regionally and around the world. The state-of-the-art video conferencing technologies provide complex pediatric cardiac care through remote and virtual examinations — whenever and wherever expertise is needed. Experts from Children’s CICUs currently oversee international programs and provide consultations and care management in Cali, Bucaramanga and Medellin, all in Colombia, as well as in Mexico City, Mexico.

For more information on telemedicine services, please visit www.chp.edu/CHP/international+services+telemedicine.

Experimental Baby Formula Doesn’t Prevent Development of Antibodies Associated with Type I Diabetes in Early Childhood

First Large Trial of Type I Diabetes Prevention Approach Still Underway

PITTSBURGH, June 10, 2014 – Early findings from the first large international trial to try to prevent type I diabetes show that infants at risk for the disease who were fed a special baby formula that lacks complex cow milk proteins still made antibodies against the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas by the time the youngest children studied were six years old. Previous studies suggested the experimental formula might prevent the development of the auto-antibodies, which represent inflammatory changes in the organ.

But that doesn’t mean the children will definitely develop type I diabetes, also known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), as they get older, caution researchers at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, which is the coordinating center for the American arm of the study. The findings were published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

In type I diabetes, the body’s immune system attacks its own pancreatic beta cells, which make insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. That autoimmune process is thought to start very early in life, explained U.S. principal investigator Dorothy Becker, MBBCh, professor of pediatrics at Children’s Hospital and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Some smaller studies and animal experiments have shown that exposure during infancy to complex foreign proteins, such as the cow milk proteins in conventional baby formula, is associated with the presence of these autoimmune antibodies in children who have a parent or sibling with the condition and other indications of genetic risk.

“This has been a controversial issue, in part because different natural history studies have come to different conclusions,” Dr. Becker said. “We hope that when our intervention trial concludes in February 2017, which is when all the participating children will be at least 10 years old, we should have enough evidence to say whether or not this experimental formula can prevent them from getting Type I diabetes.”

From 2002 to 2007 at 78 study sites in 15 countries, the “Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk,” or TRIGR, research group randomly assigned 1,078 high-risk infants to be weaned to a “hydrolyzed” formula made almost completely with smaller, less complex casein proteins and 1,081 to get conventional formula, which is made with 80 percent cow milk proteins and 20 percent of the hydrolyzed casein protein. The two formulas were similar in taste and smell so that neither the parents nor researchers could tell the difference between them. Each baby’s parents made their own decisions about breastfeeding and age of weaning to formula.

Blood samples from the umbilical cord and at three, six, nine, 12, 18 and 24 months of age, and yearly after that to age 10, were tested for antibody levels. After an average of seven years of follow-up — the youngest participants are now six — the researchers found no differences in antibody levels between the two groups.

“This tells us that the kind of formula the baby drinks doesn’t affect the inflammatory changes going on in the pancreas,” Dr. Becker said. “But it doesn’t tell us yet whether they will develop diabetes. In one animal study, mice that were fed the experimental formula had the inflammatory markers, but diabetes was almost totally prevented using the same experimental formula. That could be the case with these children, too.”

The TRIGR study group includes the Data Management Unit and researchers from six centers in the U.S., centers in Scandinavia led by the University of Helsinki, and centers throughout Canada, Australia and Europe.

The project was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, both part of the National Institutes of Health (grant numbers HD040364, HD042444 and 338 HD051997); the Canadian Institutes of Health Research; the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International; and the Commission of the European Communities.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Named One of America’s Top 10 Children’s Hospitals

PITTSBURGH, June 10, 2014 – Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC has been named one of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

Children’s Hospital ranks ninth on the magazine’s 2014-15 Honor Roll of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals, which was released today. Children’s also ranks in each of the 10 pediatrics specialties ranked by U.S. News. This is the fifth consecutive year Children’s has been named to U.S. News’ Honor Roll.

The Best Children’s Hospitals rankings highlight the top 50 U.S. pediatric hospitals in each of 10 specialties: cancer; cardiology and heart surgery; diabetes and endocrinology; gastroenterology and GI surgery; neonatology; nephrology; neurology and neurosurgery; orthopaedics; pulmonology; and urology.

Children’s ranked in the top 25 of all 10 specialties, including fifth in diabetes and endocrinology; sixth in gastroenterology and GI surgery; sixth in pulmonology; eighth in neonatology; and ninth in neurology and neurosurgery.

“Our inclusion on the honor roll and our rankings in each of the 10 specialties speaks to the breadth and depth of our clinical programs,” said Christopher Gessner, Children’s president. “It speaks to the expertise and commitment of our physicians, nurses and other staff who make Children’s Hospital a global leader in pediatric health care.”

The 2014-15 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings will be released online today and also will be published in the U.S. News Best Hospitals 2015 guidebook, available in August.

In addition to Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, the other hospitals named to U.S. News’ Honor Roll of Best Children’s Hospitals for 2014-15 are:

  • Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
  • Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston
  • Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
  • Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio
  • Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago
  • Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, Baltimore

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation Receives $2.5 Million Gift from the Mario Lemieux Foundation to Establish New Lymphoma Center

PITTSBURGH, June 4, 2014Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation announced today that it has received a $2.5 million gift from the Mario Lemieux Foundation to establish a new center for rare and hard-to-treat lymphomas that is expected to benefit children and young adults from around the world.

UPMC will provide matching funds to support the creation of the Mario Lemieux Lymphoma Center for Children and Young Adults at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

The center will focus on clinical care as well as laboratory and clinical research surrounding difficult-to-treat childhood lymphomas. It will be led by Linda McAllister-Lucas, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Children’s Hospital. She is an internationally recognized expert in lymphoma whose laboratory research has provided new insights into the molecular basis of these types of diseases.

Representatives from the Mario Lemieux Foundation, including Mario Lemieux, joined leaders from Children’s Hospital and its Foundation for today’s announcement. The Mario Lemieux Foundation will donate $2.5 million over seven years, with $2.5 million in matching support from UPMC.

“We are grateful to Mario and Nathalie Lemieux and to the Mario Lemieux Foundation for sharing our vision of a center that capitalizes on our unique expertise to offer hope to a group of patients with a devastating diagnosis,” said Greg Barrett, president, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation.

Lymphoma is the third most common type of childhood cancer, and in the United States, more than 1,500 children are diagnosed per year with some form of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society. While standardized treatment protocols are used for the majority of pediatric lymphoma cases, currently there is no effective treatment for up to 20 percent of patients.

“I was fortunate to have a type of lymphoma that has proven treatments with good outcomes,” Mario Lemieux said. “I want to create a place of hope for kids and young adults and their families who are diagnosed with lymphomas that have no known cures.”

In addition to the research of Dr. McAllister-Lucas, who has studied rare lymphomas with her husband, Peter Lucas, M.D., Ph.D., since 1999, Ed Prochownik, M.D., Ph.D., and J. Anthony Graves, M.D., Ph.D., both physician scientists within pediatric oncology at Children’s, direct research laboratories investigating the mechanisms that underlie the development of lymphoma. The Lemieux gift will now allow Children’s to also recruit an expert clinical researcher who can coordinate clinical trials of cutting-edge treatments for lymphomas, improving research that can have a global impact on care. In addition, the gift will foster the growth of the hospital’s Survivorship Program to support our patients who survive childhood cancer, the majority of whom have had leukemia and lymphoma.

“Children’s and Pittsburgh already had a strong infrastructure in place to provide treatment for lymphomas and other childhood cancers, including a renowned bone marrow transplant program, a cancer program dedicated to adolescents and young adults, and a close collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute,” said Dr. McAllister-Lucas, who joined Children’s and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in 2012 from the University of Michigan. “The support of the Mario Lemieux Foundation gives us the ability to enhance our basic and clinical research in a way that could lead to improved and potentially new treatments for patients from around the world who currently have very limited options.”

The Mario Lemieux Foundation has been an important supporter of Children’s for many years. The Foundation endowed a fund for pediatric cancer research, has helped to build beautiful spaces within the hospital that help all our patients, including an Austin’s Playroom that is open to all inpatients and offers extended hours, and the Lemieux Sibling Center for young brothers and sisters of patients who have to accompany the family to the hospital, as well as partnered with local Microsoft employees to outfit over 100 inpatient rooms with Xboxes to help distract kids during long hospital stays.

Review of Presentations from Children’s Hospital Liver Transplantation Conference Published in Molecular Genetics Journal

PITTSBURGH, May 20, 2014 – Presentations from Challenging the Paradigms: Liver Transplantation Metabolic Disease at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC were summarized in Molecular Genetics and Metabolism. The conference, which focused on metabolic liver transplantation, featured presentations on the evolution of liver transplantation as a viable treatment approach for an increasing number of metabolic diseases in a variety of clinical situations.

The review, Liver Transplantation for Pediatric Metabolic Disease, focuses on metabolic diseases that can be cured and improved by liver transplantation, as well as metabolic diseases that should be further considered for treatment by liver transplantation. Current indications and outcomes of transplantation and organ allocation issues are also addressed.

Authors include George Mazariegos, MD, Sara McIntire, MD, Jerry Vockley, MD, PhD, Ira J. Fox, MD, and Benjamin Shneider, MD, of Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC; Barbara Burtone, MD, of Ann & Robert Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago; Nedim Hadzic, MD, PhD, of King’s College Hospital in London; Priya Kishnani, MD, of Duke University; D. Holmes Morton, MD, of the Clinic for Special Children; Ronald J. Sokol, MD, of Children’s Hospital Colorado; Marshall Summar, MD Children’s National Medical Center; Desiree White, PhD, of Washington University; and Vincent Chavanon of Mount Sinai Hospital.

Children’s Hospital Physician Authors Paper on LMTK2 Facilitation of CFTR Endocytosis

PITTSBURGH, May 20, 2014 – A physician from Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC was part of a team that wrote a paper on the link between Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Lemur Tyrosine Kinase 2 (LMTK2) for the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients who are taking medication. The paper was published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Agnieszka Swiatecka-Urban, MD, assistant professor of nephrology at Children’s Hospital, and assistant professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, was one of the authors of the paper, LMTK2 Mediated Phosphorylation Regulates CFTR Endocytosis in Human Airway Epithelial Cell. The data in the paper indicates that targeting the protein LMTK2 may increase the cell surface density of CFTR Cl- channels and improve the stability of pharmacologically rescued ΔF508-CFTR in patients with cystic fibrosis. Their finding may also be applicable to the mechanisms of decreased CFTR function in smoking-related lung diseases.

Additional authors include Kristine M. Cihil, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Simão Luz, PhD, Margarida D. Amaral, PhD, and Carlos M. Farinha, PhD, all of the University of Lisboa in Portugal; and David L. Brautigan, PhD, of the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Study Shows Rise in Emergency Department Visits for Traumatic Brain Injury

PITTSBURGH, May 13, 2014 – There was a nearly 30 percent increase in the rate of visits to United States’ emergency departments (ED) for traumatic brain injury (TBI) from 2006 to 2010, according to a study led by a Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC physician. The rise might be attributable to a number of factors, including increased awareness and diagnoses.

Results of the study, led by Jennifer R. Marin, M.D., M.Sc., an emergency medicine physician at Children’s Hospital, are published in the recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The team used data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) database to determine national trends in ED visits for TBI from 2006 through 2010. NEDS is a nationally representative database and includes 25 to 50 million visits from more than 950 hospitals each year. Additionally, the authors used U.S. census data in order to determine incidence rates and the burden of traumatic brain injury on the U.S. population.

“The reason for this increase may be because more people are sustaining head injuries, patients are more aware of TBI and more likely to seek emergency care, health care professionals are more vigilant about making these diagnoses, or a combination of these,” said Dr. Marin, also assistant professor of pediatrics and emergency medicine at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “The findings underscore the need for more evaluation into why and how to reverse these trends so that we can minimize the incidence of traumatic brain injury and the consequences associated with these injuries.”

The team found that in 2010 there were an estimated 2.5 million ED visits for TBI, representing a 29 percent increase in the rate of visits for TBI during the study period. By comparison, total ED visits increased by 3.6 percent. The majority of the increase in the incidence of TBI occurred in visits coded as concussion or unspecified head injury. Children younger than 3 years and adults older than 60 years had the largest increase in TBI rates. The majority of visits were for minor injuries and most patients were discharged from the ED.

“Traumatic brain injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality each year,” Dr. Marin said. “There has been widespread attention to traumatic brain injury, specifically in terms of prevention, in the last decade by policy makers and health professionals. Large-scale studies that assess national statistics and trends are one of the few ways we have to understand the scope of the problem.”

The authors suggest that the increase in TBI among the very young and very old may indicate these age groups do not benefit as much from public health interventions, such as concussion and helmet laws and safer sports’ practices.

For more information on Dr. Marin and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, visit www.chp.edu.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Researcher Receives Prestigious Research Award

PITTSBURGH, May 5, 2014 – The Academic Pediatric Association (APA) has awarded Alejandro Hoberman, M.D., chief, Division of General Academic Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, its 2014 APA Research Award. The award will be presented today at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

The award acknowledges his contributions toward advancing pediatric knowledge through excellence in research, originality, creativity and methodological soundness. Dr. Hoberman is known for his research on acute otitis media (AOM) and urinary tract infections (UTI).

The quality and influence of Dr. Hoberman’s research is evident from the journals in which they are published, including the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), JAMA Pediatrics, and Pediatrics. He has served on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) special emphasis panels, NIH strategic planning workgroups, American Academy of Pediatrics guideline committees, and as a member of the Clinical and Translational Science Award Child Health Oversight Committee.

Dr. Hoberman graduated from medical school in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he completed a general pediatrics residency at the Children’s Hospital of Buenos Aires. He then came to the United States for fellowship training in ambulatory pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh under Jack L. Paradise, M.D., and Kenneth Rogers, M.D. Immediately following the fellowship, he joined the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, and currently leads the Division of General Academic Pediatrics. In 2000, Dr. Hoberman was named the first Jack L. Paradise, M.D., Professor of Pediatric Research at Children’s.

“Everything goes back to what I learned from Dr. Paradise, who received the APA Research Award 20 years ago,” Dr. Hoberman said. “I remember watching him take great care with research participants to conduct a careful examination, and sitting with families to discuss clinical findings and how we were trying to learn how to provide better, evidenced-based care for their children and future generations of children. That personal touch and connection with families, which Dr. Paradise taught by example, enables trust and the understanding that the research team will always have the participant’s best interest in mind and provide the most comprehensive and careful medical care.”

“It was apparent soon after Dr. Hoberman’s arrival at Children’s that he had great promise,” said Jack L. Paradise, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “He has more than met expectations, conducting important research while at the same time building one of the country’s strongest divisions of academic general pediatrics and serving as a role model for pediatric trainees at all levels. He richly deserves this prestigious award.”

In addition to receiving the award in Vancouver, Dr. Hoberman presented the results of his multi-center study showing how prophylactic antibiotics prevent urinary tract infection recurrences in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

For more information on Dr. Hoberman and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, visit www.chp.edu.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Expert Shows Prophylactic Antibiotics Prevent Urinary Tract Infection Recurrences in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, May 4, 2014 – A study led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC demonstrated that children diagnosed with an abnormal flow of urine from the bladder to the upper urinary tract, called vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), can avoid recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) by taking daily low-dose antibiotics, although the treatment didn’t reduce their risk for UTI-induced kidney scarring. The results of the multi-center study will be presented today at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The study also is published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Our study provides a clear message that recurrences of UTI in children with vesicoureteral reflux can be prevented, some of these children appear pretty sick when they have a UTI with fever,” said Alejandro Hoberman, M.D., chief, Division of General Academic Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh. “VUR is present in one-third of children presenting with UTI accompanied by a fever and has been associated with a heightened risk of kidney scarring. One way to decrease infection risk is to give children antibiotics when they are well, called antimicrobial prophylaxis.”

Earlier randomized, controlled trials that compared anti-reflux surgery with antimicrobial prophylaxis showed no differences in rates of recurrent UTIs and renal scarring; however, the actual efficacy of either treatment could not be determined because the studies lacked a placebo or observation comparison groups. Recently conducted randomized trials have reported conflicting results about the effectiveness of antimicrobial prophylaxis in reducing recurrences.

“This study showed unequivocal evidence that antimicrobial prophylaxis reduced at least in half the likelihood of children having recurrent UTIs,” said Dr. Hoberman, also professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “Some subgroups of children derived the most benefit, particularly those with bladder and bowel dysfunction at baseline, and those in whom the UTI occurred with fever.”

The goal of the two-year study was to determine if giving children low-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole would prevent recurrent UTIs, decrease kidney scarring and contribute to the emergence of bacterial resistance.

The study, named the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) Trial, enrolled 607 children ages 2 to 71 months who were diagnosed with VUR following a first or second episode of UTI. Participants were recruited from 19 clinical trial centers in the United States and underwent kidney scans to determine if scarring was present. They were then randomized to receive trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or a placebo. Kidney scans were repeated at one and two years after study entry.

Results showed that 39 of 302 children (13 percent) receiving antimicrobial prophylaxis developed UTIs compared to 72 of 305 (24 percent) receiving placebo. Antimicrobial prophylaxis reduced the risk of infections by 50 percent compared with placebo.

“Rates of renal scarring at the outcome visit were low and not reduced by prophylaxis, perhaps because most children were enrolled after their first infection and because parents, instructed to be vigilant, sought early medical attention,” said Dr. Hoberman. “Not unexpectedly, recurrences that did occur in children who received prophylaxis were more likely to have been caused by a resistant pathogen.”

This research was supported by grants U01 DK074059, U01 DK074053, U01 DK074082, U01 DK074064, U01 DK074062, U01 DK074063 from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services. This trial also was supported by the University of Pittsburgh Clinical and Translational Science Award (UL1RR024153 and UL1TR000005) and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Clinical and Translational Science Award (UL1TR000003) both from the National Center for Research Resources, now at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health.

For more information on Dr. Hoberman and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, visit www.chp.edu.

Children’s Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Conducting Remote EEG Monitoring

PITTSBURGH, April 25, 2014 – The Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU) at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC has begun conducting remote video monitoring of newborns in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC. Electroencephalographic (EEG) video monitoring began in early 2014, and since then, the EMU has monitored four babies at Magee.

The EMU team at Children’s can visually monitor babies, at the request of the Magee NICU, through a camera installed at their bedsides.

The EMU now performs outpatient EEG testing at Children’s East in addition to Children’s Pine Center and Children’s South.

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