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The Heart Institute at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Announces Leadership Changes

Print Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC has announced new leadership appointments in its Heart Institute and Division of Pediatric Cardiology.

Jacqueline Kreutzer, MD, professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, is now appointed as chief of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology.

An internationally recognized leader in interventional cardiology, Kreutzer currently is serving as director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at Children’s Hospital. She completed a pediatric cardiology fellowship and training in interventional cardiology at Boston Children’s Hospital and is board-certified in pediatric cardiology and adult congenital heart disease. Kreutzer joined Children’s Hospital in 2005.

Kreutzer has been a clinical champion for the Division of Pediatric Cardiology, distinguished in the field of interventional cardiology innovation, bringing new techniques to Children’s Hospital. She has served as the institutional investigator on numerous clinical trials for investigational devices and currently is the national principal investigator for the Melody transcatheter pulmonary valve post-approval study.

Kreutzer has authored more than 80 publications and serves as editor and reviewer for several journals, including the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. She has lectured extensively and served in numerous academic positions such as for the American Board of Pediatrics, American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association and the Society of Cardiac Angiography and Intervention.

Vivek Allada, MD, professor of pediatrics at the Pitt School of Medicine, has been appointed executive director of the Heart Institute at Children’s Hospital.

Allada completed his pediatric cardiology fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles, specializing in non-invasive imaging. He has served as the clinical director of pediatric cardiology in the Department of Pediatrics since 2006 and as the interim division chief since 2012. He is recognized nationally, having co-chaired the Committee on Pediatric Echocardiography Laboratory for the American Society of Echocardiography. Allada has distinguished himself as a clinical leader with outstanding administrative talents while leading the Division of Pediatric Cardiology and the Heart Institute. Along with his new role overseeing the Heart Institute strategic plans, he will continue as clinical director for the Division of Pediatric Cardiology.

“Drs. Kreutzer and Allada have been instrumental in the development and success of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology and the Heart Institute,” said Terence Dermody, MD, chair of the Department of Pediatrics, Pitt School of Medicine, and physician-in-chief and scientific director at Children’s Hospital. “Under their leadership, many new clinical initiatives have been developed, resulting in the highest quality ratings and substantial growth for the overall cardiology program.”

In addition to Kreutzer and Allada, Children’s Heart Institute is co-directed by Victor Morell, MD, chief of the Division of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery. Under Morell’s leadership, Children’s pediatric cardiovascular surgery program has outcomes that are among the highest in the nation. Children’s had one of the lowest overall four-year surgical mortality rates among all high-volume programs with a mortality rate under 2 percent and was awarded a 3-Star rating by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (2012-2016), one of only eleven programs to receive this distinction. Nationally, the average mortality rate for all pediatric cardiovascular programs was 3.1 percent during the same reporting period.

To learn more about the Heart Institute, please visit www.chp.edu/heart.

Officials Announce New Chair of Pediatrics at Pitt and Scientific Director of Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

PrintTerence S. Dermody, MD, has been named the new chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and physician-in-chief and scientific director at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

Dr. Dermody will officially begin on June 1. He joins Children’s Hospital from Vanderbilt University, where he is the Dorothy Overall Wells Professor of Pediatrics, director of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, and director of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He also is a professor of pathology, microbiology and immunology at Vanderbilt.

“Terry Dermody is a world renowned researcher, compassionate physician, visionary leader and just an all-around first class person,” said Christopher Gessner, president, Children’s Hospital. “We are thrilled that he will be joining our team as we continue to grow our clinical and research programs and make Children’s the place to be for pediatric physicians and physician scientists to launch and build their careers.”

Dr. Dermody is a virologist with interests in viral pathogenesis and vaccine development. He has focused mainly on reovirus, an important experimental model for studies of viral encephalitis in infants, and on chikungunya virus, an arthropod-borne virus that causes epidemics of febrile arthritis.

The work in Dr. Dermody’s lab has encompassed several inter-related themes including the structural basis of viral attachment and cell entry, mechanisms of genome replication and packaging, patterns of cell signaling and gene expression occurring in response to viral infection, mechanisms of virus-induced apoptosis and its significance in the viral life cycle, and the role of viral receptor distribution and utilization in disease pathology. Currently, the lab is developing viral vectors for oncolytic and vaccine applications.

“Dr. Dermody came highly recommended by leaders in our Department of Pediatrics,” noted Arthur S. Levine, M.D., senior vice chancellor for the health sciences and John and Gertrude Petersen Dean of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh. “His academic interests, which included running Vanderbilt’s M.D./Ph.D. training program, are unusually broad. An exceptional physician and scientist, he will be an asset to our faculty, residents and students.”

“I am honored to be able to join the team in Pittsburgh and be a part of this world-class pediatric facility dedicated to improving the lives of children,” said Dr. Dermody. “I am eager to begin and have the opportunity to work with the talented physicians and scientists at Children’s Hospital. I feel honored and humbled to have this opportunity.”

Dr. Dermody succeeds David H. Perlmutter, M.D., who recently left Children’s to become executive vice chancellor for medical affairs and dean of medicine at Washington University in St. Louis.

Dr. Dermody received his bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in 1978, and his medical degree from Columbia University in 1982. He completed an internal medicine residency at Presbyterian Hospital in New York in 1985 and fellowships in infectious diseases and molecular virology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in 1988.

He has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles, reviews and chapters about his research, which is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Lamb Foundation. He currently holds five NIH grants, and his research has been continually funded by the NIH since 1987.

He has been recognized for his research accomplishments with the Ernest W. Goodpasture Faculty Research Award, the Grant W. Liddle Award for Leadership in the Promotion of Scientific Research, and an NIH MERIT Award. He is a past president of the American Society for Virology, past chair of the AAMC GREAT Group M.D./Ph.D. Section Steering Committee, and current chair of the Virology Division of the International Union of Microbiological Societies.

For more information on Dr. Dermody and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, visit www.chp.edu.

- See more at: http://www.chp.edu/news/011116-new-pediatrics-chair#sthash.Wr8mpdQv.dpuf

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation Invests in Cardiovascular Regeneration Research

PrintPITTSBURGH, Aug. 20, 2015Bernard Kühn, M.D., a scientist at the Richard King Mellon Foundation Institute for Pediatric Research at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, is being awarded a $200,000 grant from the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation.

The grant is being provided from the Fund for Genomic Discovery, which was raised by the Foundation’s Research and Education Program Committee. Established in 2012, the Research and Education Program Committee promotes the awareness of funding needs and priorities of physician-scientists at Children’s Hospital. Through various fundraising initiatives, the committee seeks to broaden the network of philanthropists, raise money to fund the gaps between government grants, and provide seed funding for new avenues of scientific investigation.

Through hosting two events, combined with additional fundraising efforts, more than $520,000 has been raised for research.

“This funding will allow my team to enter the field of fibrosis research, a new area of investigation for my lab. If successful, this project will provide a broadly applicable molecular-genetic blueprint for the field of cardiovascular development and for developing new drugs to reduce fibrosis in heart disease,” said Dr. Kühn, associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “Working directly with me on this research is Dennis Kostka, Ph.D., an expert in Developmental Biology and Computational & Systems Biology, who will offer his expertise on the computational aspects of the research.”

Dr. Kühn, also the director of research at Children’s Heart Institute, joined the faculty in September 2014, and has been focused on the unique workings of heart muscle cells. His long-term objective is to provide novel approaches and molecular targets for the treatment of heart failure, primarily by studying the mechanisms of growth and regeneration of the myocardium, the muscle tissue of the heart.

Dr. Kühn and his team of researchers are focused on cardiomyocytes, the cells of the heart muscle, and discovering ways to make them replicate and proliferate so as to enable the heart to heal itself in cases of heart failure or congenital defects.

“Dr. Kühn is one of the leading researchers in heart regeneration and this funding will give him the opportunity to further explore the growth of heart cells and the advancement of treatments for heart failure,” said David H. Perlmutter, M.D., physician-in-chief and scientific director, Children’s Hospital, and Distinguished Professor and Vira I. Heinz Endowed Chair, Department of Pediatrics, Pitt School of Medicine.

Dr. Kühn is the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including the American College of Cardiology’s prestigious Young Investigator Award, the Basil O’Connor Award from the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, and Scientist Development Grant from the American Heart Association.

For more information on Dr. Kühn, please visit www.chp.edu.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Named One of America’s Top 10 Children’s Hospitals for Sixth Consecutive Year

PrintPITTSBURGH, June 9, 2015 – Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC has once again been named one of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report, making this the sixth consecutive year the hospital has been listed on the Honor Roll.

Children’s Hospital ranks eighth on the magazine’s 2015-16 Honor Roll of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals, which was released today. Children’s also ranks in each of the 10 pediatrics specialties ranked by U.S. News.

The Best Children’s Hospitals rankings highlight the top 50 U.S. pediatric hospitals in each of 10 specialties: cancer; cardiology and heart surgery; diabetes and endocrinology; gastroenterology and GI surgery; neonatology; nephrology; neurology and neurosurgery; orthopedics; pulmonology; and urology.

The hospital ranked in the top 25 in nine of the specialties, including second in gastroenterology and GI surgery; third in diabetes and endocrinology; sixth in pulmonology; and 10th in three categories: cardiology and heart surgery, neonatology, and neurology and neurosurgery.

“This recognition speaks to the talent, passion, and dedication of our physicians, nurses, staff, and volunteers,” said Christopher Gessner, president, Children’s Hospital. “We are proud to have built a reputation of excellence over our 125-year history and we’re grateful to have those efforts recognized.”

The 2015-16 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings will be released online today and also will be published in the U.S. News “Best Hospitals 2016” guidebook, available in September.

U.S. News introduced the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings in 2007 to help families of children with rare or life-threatening illnesses find the best medical care available. The rankings open the door to an array of detailed information about each hospital’s performance.

In addition to Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, the other hospitals named to U.S. News’ Honor Roll of Best Children’s Hospitals for 2015-16 are:

  • Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
  • Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston
  • Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora
  • Seattle Children’s Hospital
  • Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio
  • Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago
  • Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

A Strategy for Stimulating Heart Muscle Regeneration in Infants, Study Finds

PrintPITTSBURGH, April 1, 2015 – Surgery often is life-saving for many infants born with heart defects, but one thing that doctors cannot do yet is replace heart muscle that is scarred and dysfunctional. Researchers from the Heart Institute at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and Boston Children’s Hospital hope to overcome the challenge by stimulating regeneration of heart tissue. The findings were described today in Science Translational Medicine.

Children born with congenital heart disease are at greater risk of developing heart failure even after surgical correction of the problem.

“It is not surprising that survivors often develop heart failure later on,” said lead author, Bernhard Kühn, M.D., director of research for the Division of Cardiology at Children’s Hospital, and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “But when these patients were given adult medicines in clinical trials, it turned out that they were not effective. The need for pediatric-specific heart failure therapies is increasingly recognized.”

For the study, the research team examined the potential of recombinant growth factor neuregulin-1 (rNRG1), which stimulates heart regeneration by driving proliferation of heart muscle cells, called cardiomyocytes.

They treated newborn mice with injections of rNRG1 at various times after heart injury and found that early treatment starting the first day after birth boosted cardiomyocyte cell division and heart function, and reduced scarring to a significantly greater degree compared to treatment that began at five days after birth. The growth factor also drove cardiomyocyte proliferation in lab tests of heart muscle samples obtained during surgery from human infants with congenital heart disease.

“These findings suggest that rNRG1 administration in infants with these birth defects might be a new therapeutic strategy for pediatric heart disease,” Dr. Kühn said. “Delivering agents early on that encourage the heart to make new cardiomyocytes could help the heart perform normally and reduce the risk of developing heart failure later in life.”

More research needs to be done before clinical testing of this strategy, the research team says. Dr. Kühn began the research while a member of the faculty at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Collaborators on the study were Balakrishnan Ganapathy, M.S., and Niyatie Ammanamanchi, M.S., both of Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC; Brian Polizzotti, Ph.D., Stuart Walsh, Ph.D., Sangita Choudhury, Ph.D., all of Boston Children’s Hospital; David Bennett, Ph.D., Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Cristobal G. dos Remedios, Ph.D., Bosch Institute; Bernhard J. Haubner, M.D., and Josef M. Penninger, M.D., both with Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

The research was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01HL106302, K08HL085143, T32HL007572, and RR028792; Boston Children’s Hospital; and the Richard King Mellon Foundation Institute for Pediatric Research at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

A Strategy for Stimulating Heart Muscle Regeneration in Infants, Study Finds

PrintSurgery often is life-saving for many infants born with heart defects, but one thing that doctors cannot do yet is replace heart muscle that is scarred and dysfunctional. Researchers from the Heart Institute at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and Boston Children’s Hospital hope to overcome the challenge by stimulating regeneration of heart tissue. The findings were described today in Science Translational Medicine.

Children born with congenital heart disease are at greater risk of developing heart failure even after surgical correction of the problem.

“It is not surprising that survivors often develop heart failure later on,” said lead author, Bernhard Kühn, M.D., director of research for the Division of Cardiology at Children’s Hospital, and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “But when these patients were given adult medicines in clinical trials, it turned out that they were not effective. The need for pediatric-specific heart failure therapies is increasingly recognized.”

For the study, the research team examined the potential of recombinant growth factor neuregulin-1 (rNRG1), which stimulates heart regeneration by driving proliferation of heart muscle cells, called cardiomyocytes.

They treated newborn mice with injections of rNRG1 at various times after heart injury and found that early treatment starting the first day after birth boosted cardiomyocyte cell division and heart function, and reduced scarring to a significantly greater degree compared to treatment that began at five days after birth. The growth factor also drove cardiomyocyte proliferation in lab tests of heart muscle samples obtained during surgery from human infants with congenital heart disease.

“These findings suggest that rNRG1 administration in infants with these birth defects might be a new therapeutic strategy for pediatric heart disease,” Dr. Kühn said. “Delivering agents early on that encourage the heart to make new cardiomyocytes could help the heart perform normally and reduce the risk of developing heart failure later in life.”

More research needs to be done before clinical testing of this strategy, the research team says. Dr. Kühn began the research while a member of the faculty at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Collaborators on the study were Balakrishnan Ganapathy, M.S., and Niyatie Ammanamanchi, M.S., both of Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC; Brian Polizzotti, Ph.D., Stuart Walsh, Ph.D., Sangita Choudhury, Ph.D., all of Boston Children’s Hospital; David Bennett, Ph.D., Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Cristobal G. dos Remedios, Ph.D., Bosch Institute; Bernhard J. Haubner, M.D., and Josef M. Penninger, M.D., both with Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

The research was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01HL106302, K08HL085143, T32HL007572, and RR028792; Boston Children’s Hospital; and the Richard King Mellon Foundation Institute for Pediatric Research at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

Pitt Team Identifies Genes that Play Critical Role in the Development of Congenital Heart Disease

PITTSBURGH, March 25, 2015 – Fetal ultrasound exams on more than 87,000 mice that were exposed to chemicals that can induce random gene mutations enabled developmental biologists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine to identify mutations associated with congenital heart disease in 61 genes, many not previously known to cause the disease. The study, published online today in Nature, indicates that the antenna-like cellular structures called cilia play a critical role in the development of these heart defects.

The findings are the culmination of an effort to find the genetic determinants of structural heart disease in the “Bench to Bassinet” program, launched six years ago by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, led at Pitt by principal investigator Cecilia Lo, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Developmental Biology, Pitt School of Medicine.

“This project has given us new insights into the biological pathways involved in development of the heart,” Dr. Lo said. “The genes and pathways identified in our study will have clinical importance for interrogating the genetic causes of congenital heart disease in patients.”

For the study, Dr. Lo’s team mated mice exposed to chemicals that could create random genetic mutations, resulting in 87,355 pregnancies. They scanned each fetus using noninvasive ultrasound and recovered over 3,000 independent cases of congenital heart defects, all incompatible with life. They sequenced the genes of mutant animals and compared them to those of unaffected offspring to identify 91 recessive mutations in 61 genes.

“We were surprised to learn many of these genes were related to the cilia, or cilia-transduced cell signaling,” Dr. Lo said. “These findings suggest cilia play a central role in the regulation of heart development, including patterning left-right asymmetry in the cardiovascular system critical for efficient oxygenation of blood.”

She added that pathways recovered in the mouse study show overlap with those associated with de novo, or spontaneous, mutations identified in congenital heart disease patients. Co-investigators of the project include other researchers from the University of Pittsburgh; the University of Massachusetts Medical School; the Jackson Laboratory; and Children’s National Medical Center.

The project was funded NHLBI grants HL098180 and HL098188; National Institute of Mental Health grant MH094564; National Human Genome Research Institute grant HG000330; and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Radiation Dose Benchmarks During Cardiac Catheterization

Division of Pediatric Cardiology faculty member, Sara Trucco, MD, was part of a team that recently published results of a study that aimed to define age-stratified, procedure-specific benchmark radiation dose levels during interventional catheterization for congenital heart disease. The study found that radiation exposure was lowest in patent ductus arteriosus closure and highest in transcatheter pulmonary valve placement. The full article is available here.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Partners with Tampa Hospital to Provide Cardiothoracic Services

PITTSBURGH, Oct. 2, 2014 Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC today announced a partnership with St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital in Tampa, Fla., to assist their team with pediatric cardiothoracic services. Surgeons from the Heart Institute at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh will provide highly specialized cardiovascular care for patients.

The partnership will be led by Victor Morell, M.D., co-director of the Heart Institute at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and chief of the Division of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh’s pediatric cardiovascular surgery program has the lowest overall four-year surgical mortality rate among all medium- and high-volume programs with a rate of 1.1 percent, according to the latest data compiled by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (2008-2012).

“We are grateful for the opportunity to bring our unique expertise in pediatric heart surgery to families in Florida,” said Dr. Morell. “We share a commitment with St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital to provide the absolute best possible pediatric care to patients and families from the Tampa area and beyond.”

In addition to collaborating with St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital’s cardiac team on surgical and non-invasive cardiology services, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh’s experts will provide support to patients, families and caregivers in St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital’s cardiac intensive care unit via telemedicine.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh is leading the way in the development of telemedicine services to meet the needs of young patients regionally and around the world with video conferencing technologies that provide complex pediatric cardiac care through remote and virtual examinations — whenever and wherever expertise is needed.

For nearly two decades, St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital has provided a full spectrum of pediatric cardiac services, from less-invasive diagnostic catheterization, nonsurgical valve replacement and electrophysiology studies, to cardiovascular surgery for the rarest and most complex congenital heart defects. St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital has been home to one of the largest pediatric cardiovascular programs in the southeast and is a regional referral center for the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects.

Prior to joining Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC in 2004, Dr. Morell led the pediatric cardiac surgical team at St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital.

“This partnership brings the expertise of some of the country’s top-ranking pediatric heart physicians to our community, providing families across Florida with unprecedented access to the highest level of pediatric heart care available,” said Kimberly Guy, president, St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital.

Third Mellon Scholar Appointed to The Richard King Mellon Foundation Institute for Pediatric Research at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

PITTSBURGH, Sept. 17, 2014 – Bernhard Kühn, M.D., a physician-scientist whose research focuses on heart failure, has been named a Scholar within the Richard King Mellon Foundation Institute for Pediatric Research and Director of Research for the Division of Cardiology at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

Dr. Kühn is the third physician-scientist in the Mellon Scholars Program, which enables promising researchers in the early stages of their careers to pursue potential breakthrough research projects in biomedicine.

Dr. Kühn is a board-certified and practicing pediatric cardiologist whose research focuses on regenerative therapies for the heart. The long-term objective of his research is to provide novel approaches and molecular targets for the treatment of heart failure, primarily by studying the mechanisms of growth and regeneration of the myocardium, the muscle tissue of the heart.

“The recruitment of Dr. Kühn will bring in one of the leading researchers in heart regeneration to further explore heart cell growth and to give hope to advancing  treatments for heart failure, said Jay Kolls, M.D., director. “He will be an outstanding addition to the Mellon Scholar Program to continually increase our understanding of the causes and treatment of pediatric diseases.”

Dr. Kühn, also associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, earned his medical and doctoral degrees from Freie Universität Berlin in Germany. He completed his post-doctoral fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital where he then established an independent research lab in 2005.

In a landmark paper published in the highly prestigious journal Cell, Dr. Kühn showed that heart muscle cells, previously thought to be incapable of proliferating, could be induced to divide with the growth factor neuregulin1. This research has opened up the possibility of using this growth factor to stimulate heart regeneration. In a follow up study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the Kühn lab showed that in humans, heart muscle cell proliferation is a mechanism of heart growth in infants and children. Together, these two papers provide the foundation for administering the growth factor to stimulate heart regeneration in pediatric patients with heart failure.

Scholars are selected on the basis of work that is highly innovative, delivering new expertise to the biomedical research community; likely to lead to major breakthroughs; and capable of having a long-lasting impact on the practice of medicine.

Stephen Maricich, M.D., Ph.D., and Timothy Sanders, M.D., Ph.D., were the first two physician-scientists recruited for the Mellon Scholars Program.

Established through a groundbreaking gift from the Richard King Mellon Foundation, the Institute is an incubator for research that challenges conventional wisdom and can lead to paradigm shifts in pediatric medicine. This kind of high-risk, high-impact investigation is not typically funded through government or conventional sources, placing Children’s Hospital in a unique realm of pediatric research centers. Dr. Kolls’ goal is to recruit a total of five scholars.

Located within the John G. Rangos Sr. Research Center on Children’s main campus, the Institute’s faculty and programs are a part of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. For more information on The Richard King Mellon Foundation Institute for Pediatric Research, please visit www.chp.edu/mellon.

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