UPMC Physician Resources

Archives for Psychiatry

Dr. Charles Reynolds wins 2016 Pardes Humanitarian Prize in Mental Heath

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation recently announced Charles F. Reynolds, III, MD, as one of the winners of the 2016 Pardes Humanitarian Prize in Mental Health. Dr. Reynolds was recognized for pioneering work in geriatric psychiatry and treatment of late-life depression. Dr. Reynolds’ fellow 2016 Parades winners included Vikram Patel, PhD, F Med Sci, for transformative work in advancing mental health care in resource-poor countries. and an Honorary Tribute to the late Senator Edward M. Kennedy for his powerful and unwavering commitment to advocating on behalf of people with mental illness.

The Pardes Humanitarian Prize in Mental Health is awarded annually to recognize individuals whose contributions have made a profound and lasting impact in advancing the understanding of mental health and improving the lives of people suffering from mental illness. It focuses public attention on the burden mental illness places on individuals and society, and the urgent need to expand mental health services globally. Established in 2014, The Pardes Humanitarian Prize in Mental Health is named in honor of Herbert Pardes, MD, a noted psychiatrist, advocate for the mentally ill, and the award’s first recipient.

Dr. Reynolds 2016 Pardes Humanitarian Prizewinner Video

“The 2016 Pardes Prize recipients have applied their scientific knowledge, deep understanding of human behavior and compassion to improve the lives of millions of people suffering from mental illness, especially those living in poverty,” said Dr. Pardes, President of the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation’s Scientific Council and Executive Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. “Their work has expanded our scope of mental illness treatment around the world. They have taught us about the needs of our diverse human family and how to use knowledge for the greater good of humanity.”

Dr. Pardes added, “Dr. Patel and Dr. Reynolds exemplify what it means to be a humanitarian.  Dr. Patel’s mission is to bring desperately needed psychiatric care to people living in countries where access to these services is limited or non-existent. Dr. Reynolds is a pioneer in geriatric psychiatry whose mission is to help the elderly lead full and productive lives in their later years.   We honor them both for their outstanding commitment to alleviating the pain and suffering of mental illness.”

Dr. Reynolds and his colleagues have made groundbreaking contributions to the prevention and treatment of depression in older adults. Depression has been identified by the World Health Organization as a leading cause of disability worldwide and a major contributor to the global burden of disease across the life cycle.

Dr. Reynolds helped to define a new global health priority as depression prevention in older adults, now recognized as a feasible public health goal. He and his colleagues have also demonstrated that depression treatment reduces both suicidal risk and cancer-related mortality risk in elderly medical patients, and his work has informed long-term treatment strategies to prevent recurrence and to delay dementia in depression with mild cognitive impairment.

Dr. Reynolds leads an NIMH study with the Goa Medical College/India and with Sangath to develop and test a scalable model of depression prevention. Building upon the contribution of Pardes Prize co-recipient Dr. Vikram Patel, this work uses lay health counselors for early intervention in mildly symptomatic older adults, thereby optimizing scarce mental health resources to prevent depression onset. The NIMH-sponsored center in late life mood disorders, which Dr. Reynolds directs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, has mentored 25 research-career development (NIH K) awardees since 1995.

In addition to co-founding the Global Consortium on Depression Prevention and editing the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Dr. Reynolds has served as president of the American College of Psychiatrists, the International College for Geriatric Psychoneuropharmacology, the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. He has received the APA Weinberg Award for lifetime contributions in geriatric psychiatry, the American College of Psychiatrists’ research award in geriatrics, the International Psychogeriatric Association lifetime service award, and the Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill.

“It is a privilege and an honor to be a recipient of the Pardes Humanitarian Prize. In our youth-focused culture, the elderly and their struggles with mental illness are often overlooked and neglected. Late-life depression is a global health priority that has immense impact on older individuals and their families. It is my sincere hope that as a society we can work to restore the joy of living to older adults affected by mental illness,” Dr. Reynolds said.

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC Host 33rd Annual Pittsburgh Schizophrenia Conference

On November 18, 2016, join Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh Department of Psychiatry for the nation’s longest running scientific meeting devoted to exploring the latest research findings related to schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.

Held at the Sheraton Station Square, this year’s program features presentations on a wide range of topics including:

  • The relevance of animal models to the prevention and treatment of schizophrenia
  • New findings in the area of genetics 
  • The importance of early detection and intervention 
  • The role of spirituality in recovery from serious mental illness

The conference also welcomes Stephen Marder, MD, Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, who will be presenting the Gerald E. Hogarty Excellence in Schizophrenia Research Memorial Lecture. Dr. Marder will present on the topic of “New Clinical Targets for Improving Functioning in Schizophrenia.”

Click here to register online and here to download the conference program.

For more information about the conference and how to register, please contact Nancy Mundy at mundynl@upmc.edu.

Click here for more resources and free online CME in psychiatry.

Correcting Metabolic Deficiencies May Improve Depression Symptoms

Identifying and treating metabolic deficiencies in patients with treatment-resistant depression can improve symptoms and in some cases even lead to remission, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine published online today in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

This research is funded through a 2014 Pitt Innovation Challenge Award from Pitt’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

“What’s really promising about these new findings is that they indicate that there may be physiological mechanisms underlying depression that we can use to improve the quality of life in patients with this disabling illness,” said David Lewis, MD, Thomas Detre Professor and Chair of Pitt’s Department of Psychiatry.

Major depressive disorder, also referred to simply as depression, affects nearly 15 million American adults and is one of the most common mental disorders. Unfortunately, at least 15 percent of patients don’t find relief from conventional treatments such as antidepressant medications and psychotherapy, explained lead study investigator Lisa Pan, MD, professor of psychiatry, and clinical and translational science, Pitt School of Medicine. Depression also is the cause of more than two-thirds of suicides that occur annually.

The groundwork for the current study was laid five years ago when Dr. Pan and David Brent, MD, Endowed Chair in suicide studies at Pitt, treated a teen with a history of suicide attempts and long-standing depression. “Over a period of years, we tried every treatment available to help this patient, and yet he still found no relief from his depression symptoms,” she explained.

Searching for answers, Dr. Pan contacted Jerry Vockley, MD, PhD, chair of genetics, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, and David Finegold, MD, professor of human genetics at Pitt’s Graduate School of Public Health, and through a series of biochemical tests, the three discovered that the patient had a cerebrospinal fluid deficiency in biopterin, a protein involved in the synthesis of several brain signaling chemicals called neurotransmitters.

After receiving an analogue of biopterin to correct the deficiency, the patient’s depression symptoms largely disappeared and today he is a thriving college student.

The success prompted the researchers to examine other young adults with depression who were not responding to treatment, explained Dr. Pan.

In the published trial, the researchers looked for metabolic abnormalities in 33 adolescents and young adults with treatment-resistant depression and 16 controls. Although the specific metabolites affected differed among patients, the researchers found that 64 percent of the patients had a deficiency in neurotransmitter metabolism, compared with none of the controls.

In almost all of these patients, treating the underlying deficiency improved their depression symptoms, and some patients even experienced complete remission. In addition, the further along the patients progress in the treatment, the better they are getting, Dr. Pan added.

“It’s really exciting that we now have another avenue to pursue for patients for whom our currently available treatments have failed. This is a potentially transformative finding for certain groups of people with depression,” said Dr. Pan.

Additional collaborators on the study are Jerry Vockley, MD, PhD,  David Brent, MD, David Finegold, MD, David Peters, PhD, Petra Martin, BS, Thomas Zimmer, BS, Anna Maria Segreti, BS, Sivan Kassiff, BS, Brian McKain, RN, MSN, Cynthia Baca, RN, MSN, Manivel Rengasamy, MD, Nicolette Walano, MS, Marion Hughes, MD, Steven Dobrowolski, PhD, Michele Pasquino, BS, Rasim Diler, MD, and James Perel, PhD, all of Pitt School of Medicine; Robert Naviaux, MD, PhD, of University of California, San Diego; Keith Hyland, PhD, of MNG Laboratories in Atlanta, Georgia; and Robert Steinfeld, MD, of University Medical Center Gottingen in Germany.

This research also was supported by funding from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and a Brain and Behavior Research Foundation NARSAD Young Investigator Award. Additional funding from the Beck and Lohman families through the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation is supporting the testing and follow up of additional patients with treatment-resistant depression and suicidal behavior, and allowing the researchers to begin to understand the underlying biological changes.

Pitt Study Shows Online Therapy Effective at Treating Depression and Anxiety

Doctors from the University of Pittsburgh showed that providing an online computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT) program both alone and in combination with Internet Support Groups (ISG) is a more effective treatment for anxiety and depression than doctors’ usual primary care. The preliminary findings were highlighted today at the annual meeting of the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) in Hollywood, Florida.

The National Institutes of Mental Health-funded randomized trial, led by Bruce L. Rollman, MD, MPH, professor of medicine and director of the Center for Behavioral Health and Smart Technology at the University of Pittsburgh, enrolled 704 depressed and anxious patients from 26 UPMC-affiliated primary care offices across western Pennsylvania.

Patients 18 to 75 years old were referred into the trial by their UPMC primary care physician between August 2012 and September 2014. Eligible and consenting patients were then randomized to one of three groups: care manager-guided access to the eight-session Beating the Blues CCBT program; care manager-guided access to both the CCBT program and a password-protected ISG patients could access 24/7 via smartphone or desktop computer; or usual behavioral health care from their primary care physician.

Over the six-month intervention, 83 percent of patients randomized to CCBT started the program, and they completed an average of 5.3 sessions. Seventy-seven percent of patients assigned to the ISG logged into the site at least once, and 46 percent provided one or more posts or comments.

Six months later, those patients randomized to CCBT reported significant improvements in their mood and anxiety symptoms and the more CCBT sessions patients completed, the greater the improvement in mood and anxiety symptoms.

Although patients randomized to both CCBT and ISG had similar overall improvements in mood and anxiety symptoms compared to patients randomized to only CCBT, secondary analysis revealed those who engaged more with the ISG tended to experience greater improvements in symptoms.

Several CCBT programs have proven as effective as face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy at treating mood and anxiety disorders and are used by many patients outside the U.S., but CCBT remains largely unknown and underutilized within the U.S., Dr. Rollman said. ISG that enable individuals with similar conditions to access and exchange self-help information and emotional support have proliferated in recent years, but benefits have yet to be established in randomized trials.

“Our study findings have important implications for transforming the way mental health care is delivered,” Dr. Rollman said. “Providing depressed and anxious patients with access to these emerging technologies may be an ideal method to deliver effective mental health treatment, especially to those who live in areas with limited access to care resources or who have transportation difficulties or work/home obligations that make in-person counseling difficult to obtain. We hope that these findings will focus further attention on the emerging field of e-mental health by other U.S. investigators.”

Researchers included Dr. Rollman, Bea Herbeck Belnap, PhD, Scott D. Rothenberger, PhD, Kaleab Abebe, PhD, Armando J. Rotondi, PhD, Michael Spring, PhD, and Jordan F. Karp, MD, all of the University of Pittsburgh.

Pitt Computational Model Finds New Protein-Protein Interactions in Schizophrenia

Approach Can Shed New Light on Biological Processes Affected by the Mental Illness

Using a computational model they developed, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have discovered more than 500 new protein-protein interactions (PPIs) associated with genes linked to schizophrenia. The findings, published online today in npj Schizophrenia, a Nature Publishing Group journal, could lead to greater understanding of the biological underpinnings of this mental illness, as well as point the way to treatments.

There have been many genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that have identified gene variants associated with an increased risk for schizophrenia, but in most cases there is little known about the proteins that these genes make, what they do and how they interact, said senior investigator Madhavi Ganapathiraju, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical informatics, Pitt School of Medicine.

“GWAS studies and other research efforts have shown us what genes might be relevant in schizophrenia,” she said. “What we have done is the next step. We are trying to understand how these genes relate to each other, which could show us the biological pathways that are important in the disease.”

Each gene makes proteins and proteins typically interact with each other in a biological process. Information about interacting partners can shed light on the role of a gene that has not been studied, revealing pathways and biological processes associated with the disease and also its relation to other complex diseases.

Dr. Ganapathiraju’s team developed a computational model called High-Precision Protein Interaction Prediction (HiPPIP) and applied it to discover PPIs of schizophrenia-linked genes identified through GWAS, as well as historically known risk genes. They found 504 never-before known PPIs, and noted also that while schizophrenia-linked genes identified historically and through GWAS had little overlap, the model showed they shared more than 100 common interactors.

“We can infer what the protein might do by checking out the company it keeps,” Dr. Ganapathiraju explained. “For example, if I know you have many friends who play hockey, it could mean that you are involved in hockey, too. Similarly, if we see that an unknown protein interacts with multiple proteins involved in neural signaling, for example, there is a high likelihood that the unknown entity also is involved in the same.”

Dr. Ganapathiraju and colleagues have drawn such inferences on protein function based on the PPIs of proteins, and made their findings available on a website Schizo-Pi that is publicly-accessible at http://severus.dbmi.pitt.edu/schizo-pi.

This information can be used by biologists to explore the schizophrenia interactome with the aim of understanding more about the disease or developing new treatment drugs.

The research team included Mohamed Thahir, MS, PhD, Adam Handen, MS, Saumendra N.  Sarkar, PhD, Robert A.  Sweet, M.D., PhD, Vishwajit L. Nimgaonkar, MD, PhD, Eileen M.  Bauer, PhD, and Srilakshmi Chaparala, MS, all of Pitt; and Christine E. Loscher, PhD, of Dublin City University, Ireland.

This project was funded by the Biobehavioral Research Awards for Innovative New Scientists (BRAINS) grant MH094564 awarded to Dr. Ganapathiraju by the National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Social Media Use Associated With Depression Among U.S. Young Adults

The more time young adults use social media, the more likely they are to be depressed, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

The findings could guide clinical and public health interventions to tackle depression, forecast to become the leading cause of disability in high-income countries by 2030. The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, is published online and scheduled for the April 1 issue of the journal Depression and Anxiety.

This was the first large, nationally representative study to examine associations between use of a broad range of social media outlets and depression. Previous studies on the subject have yielded mixed results, been limited by small or localized samples, and focused primarily on one specific social media platform, rather than the broad range often used by young adults.

“Because social media has become such an integrated component of human interaction, it is important for clinicians interacting with young adults to recognize the balance to be struck in encouraging potential positive use, while redirecting from problematic use,” said senior author Brian A. Primack, MD, PhD, director of Pitt’s Center for Research on Media, Technology and Health.

In 2014, Dr. Primack and his colleagues sampled 1,787 U.S. adults ages 19 through 32, using questionnaires to determine social media use and an established depression assessment tool.

The questionnaires asked about the 11 most popular social media platforms at the time: Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Google Plus, Instagram, Snapchat, Reddit, Tumblr, Pinterest, Vine and LinkedIn.

On average the participants used social media a total of 61 minutes per day and visited various social media accounts 30 times per week. More than a quarter of the participants were classified as having “high” indicators of depression.

There were significant and linear associations between social media use and depression whether social media use was measured in terms of total time spent or frequency of visits. For example, compared with those who checked least frequently, participants who reported most frequently checking social media throughout the week had 2.7 times the likelihood of depression. Similarly, compared to peers who spent less time on social media, participants who spent the most total time on social media throughout the day had 1.7 times the risk of depression. The researchers controlled for other factors that may contribute to depression, including age, sex, race, ethnicity, relationship status, living situation, household income and education level.

Lead author Lui yi Lin, BA, who will be graduating from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine this spring, emphasized that, because this was a cross-sectional study, it does not disentangle cause and effect.

“It may be that people who already are depressed are turning to social media to fill a void,” she said.

Conversely, Ms. Lin explains that exposure to social media also may cause depression, which could then in turn fuel more use of social media. For example:

• Exposure to highly idealized representations of peers on social media elicits feelings of envy and the distorted belief that others lead happier, more successful lives.

• Engaging in activities of little meaning on social media may give a feeling of “time wasted” that negatively influences mood.

• Social media use could be fueling “Internet addiction,” a proposed psychiatric condition closely associated with depression.

• Spending more time on social media may increase the risk of exposure to cyber-bullying or other similar negative interactions, which can cause feelings of depression.

In addition to encouraging clinicians to ask about social media use among people who are depressed, the findings could be used as a basis for public health interventions leveraging social media. Some social media platforms already have made forays into such preventative measures. For example, when a person searches the blog site Tumblr for tags indicative of a mental health crisis—such as “depressed,” “suicidal” or “hopeless”—they are redirected to a message that begins with “Everything OK?” and provided with links to resources. Similarly, a year ago Facebook tested a feature that allows friends to anonymously report worrisome posts. The posters would then receive pop-up messages voicing concern and encouraging them to speak with a friend or helpline.

“Our hope is that continued research will allow such efforts to be refined so that they better reach those in need,” said Dr. Primack, who also is assistant vice chancellor for health and society in Pitt’s Schools of the Health Sciences and professor of medicine. “All social media exposures are not the same. Future studies should examine whether there may be different risks for depression depending on whether the social media interactions people have tend to be more active vs. passive or whether they tend to be more confrontational vs. supportive. This would help us develop more fine-grained recommendations around social media use.”

Additional authors of the study were Jaime E. Sidani, PhD, Ariel Shensa, MA, Ana Radovic, MD, MSc., Elizabeth Miller, MD, PhD, Jason B. Colditz, MEd, Beth Hoffman, BSc, and Leila M. Giles, BS, all of Pitt.

This research was funded by National Institute of Mental Health grant R25-MH054318 and National Cancer Institute grant R01-CA140150.

Some Chronic Viral Infections Could Contribute to Cognitive Decline with Aging

Certain chronic viral infections could contribute to subtle cognitive deterioration in apparently healthy older adults, according to a study led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University that was recently published in the journal Alzheimer’s Disease and Associated Disorders.

Many cross-sectional studies, which capture information from a single time point, have suggested a link between exposure to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses (HSV) 1 and 2, as well as the protozoa Toxoplasma gondii and decreased cognitive functioning, said lead investigator Vishwajit Nimgaonkar, M.D., professor of psychiatry, Pitt School of Medicine.

“Our study is one of the few to assess viral exposure and cognitive functioning measures over a period of time in a group of older adults,” he said. “It’s possible that these viruses, which can linger in the body long after acute infection, are triggering some neurotoxic effects.”
The researchers looked for signs of viral exposures in blood samples that were collected during the “Monongahela-Youghiogheny Healthy Aging Team” (MYHAT) study, in which more than 1,000 participants 65 years and older were evaluated annually for five years to investigate cognitive change over time.

They found CMV, HSV-2 or toxoplasma exposure is associated with different aspects of cognitive decline in older people that could help explain what is often considered to be age-related decline.

“This is important from a public health perspective, as these infections are very common and several options for prevention and treatment are available,” noted senior investigator Mary Ganguli, M.D., M.P.H., professor of psychiatry at Pitt. “As we learn more about the role that infectious agents play in the brain, we might develop new prevention strategies for cognitive impairment.”

Now, the researchers are trying to determine if there are subgroups of people whose brains are more vulnerable to the effects of chronic viral infection.

Fine Particulate Air Pollution Associated With Increased Risk of Childhood Autism

PITTSBURGH, May 21, 2015 – Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child’s life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania.

The research is funded by The Heinz Endowments and published in the July edition of Environmental Research.

“Autism spectrum disorders are lifelong conditions for which there is no cure and limited treatment options, so there is an urgent need to identify any risk factors that we could mitigate, such as pollution,” said lead author Evelyn Talbott, Dr.P.H., professor of epidemiology at Pitt Public Health. “Our findings reflect an association, but do not prove causality. Further investigation is needed to determine possible biological mechanisms for such an association.”

Dr. Talbott and her colleagues performed a population-based, case-control study of families with and without ASD living in six southwestern Pennsylvania counties. They obtained detailed information about where the mothers lived before, during and after pregnancy and, using a model developed by Pitt Public Health assistant professor and study co-author Jane Clougherty, Sc.D., were able to estimate individual exposure to a type of air pollution called PM2.5.

This type of pollution refers to particles found in the air that are less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter, or 1/30th the average width of a human hair. PM2.5 includes dust, dirt, soot and smoke. Because of its small size, PM2.5 can reach deeply into the lungs and get into the blood stream. Southwestern Pennsylvania has consistently ranked among the nation’s worst regions for PM2.5 levels, according to data collected by the American Lung Association.

“There is increasing and compelling evidence that points to associations between Pittsburgh’s poor air quality and health problems, especially those affecting our children and including issues such as autism spectrum disorder and asthma,” said Grant Oliphant, president of The Heinz Endowments. “While we recognize that further study is needed, we must remain vigilant about the need to improve our air quality and to protect the vulnerable. Our community deserves a healthy environment and clean air.”

Autism spectrum disorders are a range of conditions characterized by social deficits and communication difficulties that typically become apparent early in childhood. Reported cases of ASD have risen nearly eight-fold in the last two decades. While previous studies have shown the increase to be partially due to changes in diagnostic practices and greater public awareness of autism, this does not fully explain the increased prevalence. Both genetic and environmental factors are believed to be responsible.

Dr. Talbott and her team interviewed the families of 211 children with ASD and 219 children without ASD born between 2005 and 2009. The families lived in Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Washington and Westmoreland counties. Estimated average exposure to PM2.5 before, during and after pregnancy was compared between children with and without ASD.

Based on the child’s exposure to concentrations of PM2.5 during the mother’s pregnancy and the first two years of life, the Pitt Public Health team found that children who fell into higher exposure groups were at an approximate 1.5-fold greater risk of ASD after accounting for other factors associated with the child’s risk for ASD – such as the mother’s age, education and smoking during pregnancy. This risk estimate is in agreement with several other recent investigations of PM2.5 and autism.

A previous Pitt Public Health analysis of the study population revealed an association between ASD and increased levels of air toxics, including chromium and styrene. Studies by other institutions using different populations also have associated pollutants with ASD.

“Air pollution levels have been declining since the 1990s; however, we know that pockets of increased levels of air pollution remain throughout our region and other areas,” said Dr. Talbott. “Our study builds on previous work in other regions showing that pollution exposures may be involved in ASD. Going forward, I would like to see studies that explore the biological mechanisms that may underlie this association.”

Additional co-authors of this study are Vincent C. Arena, Ph.D., Judith R. Rager, M.P.H., Drew R. Michanowicz, Dr.P.H., Ravi K. Sharma, Ph.D., and Shaina L. Stacy, Ph.D., all of Pitt Public Health.

UPMC Inpatient Child and Adolescent Bipolar Services (In-CABS) Program Receives National Honor for Technological Initiatives

PITTSBURGH, April 6, 2015 – The Inpatient Child and Adolescent Bipolar Services (In-CABS) program at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC has received a first prize National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2015 Impact Award of Excellence in Health Information Technology. The award, which will be announced on April 21 at the Excellence Awards Dinner in conjunction with the National Council Conference in Orlando, recognizes In-CABS’ use of health IT interventions, comprehensive diagnostic assessments, state-of-the-art pharmacological treatment, and psychosocial interventions. The program also trains students and professionals from a broad range of disciplines in health IT.

Each year, the National Council’s Awards of Excellence honor individuals and organizations that are making large strides in fighting mental illness and addiction. Specifically, the awards celebrate the achievements of individuals who dedicate themselves to improving the lives of those with serious mental illnesses, and the accomplishments and efforts of those living with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in improving their own lives and the lives of their peers.

“This award is important for In-CABS because it acknowledges our high-tech, innovative initiatives in our daily morning report and triage,” says Rasim Somer Diler, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and medical director of Inpatient Child and Adolescent Bipolar Services. “We’ve also implemented the Philips® Actiwatch to objectively measure sleep and arousal using neurocognitive measures, and we set up daily electronic mood and energy monitoring with an interactive projector through the Beckwith Institute’s Clinical Transformation Program.”

To learn more about In-CABS, please download the program brochure.

Geriatric Psychiatry Experts Present at AAGP 2015 Annual Meeting

PITTSBURGH, April 2, 2015 – UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh were well-represented at the recent American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry 2015 Annual Meeting in New Orleans. UPMC and the Department of Psychiatry hosted an alumni and friends cocktail reception during the meeting.

Faculty research also was featured in oral and poster presentations throughout the conference, including topics such as:

  • Non-Pharmacological Management of Behavioral Disturbance in Dementia
    Chair: Lalith Solai, MD
  • Research Update: Healthy Aging and Prevention of Late-Life Mood and Cognitive Disorders
    Faculty: Charles Reynolds III, MD
  • Update on Geriatric Sleep Disorders
    Faculty: Charles Reynolds III, MD
  • Neurocircuitry Dysfunction in Late-Life Depression: The Role of Negative Valence Systems and Cognitive Control Networks
    Faculty: Howard Aizenstein, MD, PhD
  • IPTci vs. PATH as Psychosocial Approaches to Cognitive Impairment: Clinical Perspectives, Advantages, and Limitations for Managing MCI to Moderate Dementia With Co-Morbid Depression
    Faculty: Mark Miller, MD
  • Recent Advances in Late Life Schizophrenia Research
    Session Chair: John Kasckow, MD, PhD
  • Opioids for Agitation in Advanced Alzheimer’s Disease
    Discussant: Crystal White, MD

For more information about the AAGP annual meeting, please visit the conference page.

Page 1 of 6:1 2 3 4 »Last »