UPMC Physician Resources

Archives for Lung Transplantation

2017 UPMC Lung Transplant Conference — Oct. 4-6

The UPMC Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Division of Lung Transplant/Lung Failure) and Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, along with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, are hosting the 2nd Annual UPMC Lung Transplant Symposium from Wednesday, Oct. 4, to Friday, Oct. 6. The conference will include a mini ECMO simulation lab, a donor heart/lung procurement wet lab, and didactic sessions led by a variety of lung transplant experts.

Join us at the Thomas E. Starzl Biomedical Science Tower beginning at 8 a.m. on Oct. 4.

UPMC Presbyterian University Hospital
Thomas E. Starzl Biomedical Science Tower
200 Lothrop St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Topics Will Include

• 2,000 Thoughts on 2,000 Lung Transplants

• Latest Developments in Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion

• Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as Bridge to Transplant

• Patient Perspective

• Post-Operative Challenges

• Special Populations

Registration

Register at https://ccehs.upmc.com/liveFormalCourses.jsf. For more information, visit UPMC.com/LungTransplantConference or contact the Conference Coordinator, Angela Kinnunen, via email at kinnunenae@upmc.edu or by telephone at 412-648-6342.

The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) 37th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions — April 4-8, San Diego

The UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute and UPMC Cardiothoracic Transplant Department will be well-represented at the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) 37th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions in San Diego, Ca. Faculty research will be featured in both oral and poster presentations throughout the conference, including:

 

Tuesday, April 4

ACAD Core ID – ISHLT Academy: Core Competency Course in Infectious Diseases in Thoracic Transplantation and Mechanical Circulatory Support

SESSION 2: This Could Happen to You…Drug Interactions and Toxicity Errors to Avoid with Anti-infectives and Immunosuppression and Cracking the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Code

Presented by: Christopher R. Ensor

 

Wednesday, April 5

Opening Plenary Session

Co-Chair: Jeffrey J. Teuteberg

 

Symposium: When Should We Call It Quits? The Efficacy of Interventions to Ameliorate Psychosocial Risk Factors

When Do We Call It Quits: Intervention Strategies and Outcomes for Medical Non-Adherence

Presented by: Mary Amanda Dew

 

Are All Substances Made Equal?

Presented by: Andrea DiMartini

 

Oral Session: Cutting Edge Updates in Infectious Diseases

0039 – Clinical Risk Factors for Invasive Aspergillosis in Lung Transplant Recipients: Results of an International Cohort Study

Presented by: C. Aguilar, B. Hamandi, C. Fegbeutel, F. P. Silveira, E. A. Verschuuren, P. Ussetti, P. V. Chin-Hong, A. Sole, C. Holmes-Liew, E. M. Billaud, P. A. Grossi, O. Manuel, D. J. Levine, R. G. Barbers, D. Hadjiliadis, L. Singer, S. Husain

 

Oral Session: Bugs and Devices: A Bad Combination

0047 – Epidemiology of Fungal Infections (FI) in Mechanical Circulatory Support Device (MCSD) Recipients: Analysis of IMACS Registry 2013-2015

Presented by: O. Morrissey, R. Xie, J. Schaenman, S. Husain, M. Mooney, T. Nakatani, R. Kormos, M. Gómez-Bueno, S. Aslam, Y. Pya, M. Hannan

 

Symposium: Thinking Outside the Box: Extra-Pulmonary Management in Lung Transplantation

New Lungs – Old Sinuses: Friends or Foes?

Presented by: Joseph M. Pilewski

 

Mini Oral Session: Allocation, Bridging and Lung Allograft Assessment Strategies

0116 – Mechanical Ventilation and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) as a Combined Bridging Strategy to Lung Transplantation: Significant Gains in Survival

Presented by: A. L. Du, J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, M. Tuft, M. Morrell, N. Shigemura

 

Mini Oral Session: The Hardware of MCS

0131 – Association Between the Use of Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring and Outcomes with Percutaneous Left Ventricular Support: A Call for Standardization?

Presented by: J. J. Teuteberg, W. O’Neill

 

0132 – Analysis of Right Ventricular (RV) Regional and Global Systolic Function by Gated Blood Pool SPECT (GBPS) in Patients Undergoing Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Implantation

Presented by: C. B. Link, A. Nayak, P. Soman, M. A. Simon, J. J. Teuteberg, L. Lagazzi, A. Althouse, R. Kormos.

 

Poster Session 1: Heart Failure

0563 – Does Heart Failure with a Lower Ejection Fraction Mean Higher Costs? Insights from Data Analytics Across a Large Health Care System

Presented by: C. B. Link, S. Koscumb, P. Lynch, R. Ramani, M. Shullo, O. Marroquin, J. J. Teuteberg

 

0570 – Utilizing Data Analytics to Identify Patients at Highest Risk of Heart Failure Readmission

Presented by: C. B. Link, S. Koscumb, P. Lynch, R. Ramani, M. A. Shullo, O. Marroquin, J. J. Teuteberg

 

Poster Session 1: Junior Faculty Clinical Case Reports

0832 – Complications Following Lung Transplantation in a Patient with Short Telomere Syndrome

Presented by: C. Naik, M. Morrell

 

0847 – Successful Resolution of Refractory Rejection with Cyclophosphamide in a Lung Transplant Recipient Intolerant to Cell Cycle and Proliferation Signal Inhibitors

Presented by: C. A. Moore, M. R. Pipeling, C. R. Ensor

 

0865 – Pay Me Now or Pay Me Later: A Tale of Two Sensitized Pediatric Heart Transplant Candidates

Presented by: M. Mangiola, B. Feingold, D. Magnetta, S. West, S. Miller, M. Zinn, M. Marrari, A. Zeevi

 

Thursday, April 6

Sunrise Symposium: “Those Darn CARVs”: Community Acquired Respiratory Viruses in Lung Transplant

In the Pipeline: Novel Therapeutics

Presented by: Christopher Ensor

 

Symposium: Antibodies in Mechanical Circulatory Support: The Phantom Menace

Epidemiology and Risk of the Sensitized MCS Patient

Presented by: Michael Shullo

 

Symposium: Taming of the Shrew: Mycobacterium Abscessus in Lung Transplantation

Management of M. Abscessus in the Lung Transplant Candidate: Preparation for Transplantation

Presented by: Fernanda Silveira

 

Symposium: HLA, AMR and DSA – Approaching Antibodies in Kids

Before Transplant: Why the PRA Doesn’t Matter Anymore

Presented by: Brian Feingold

 

0225 – Neopterin Elevation and Survival Following Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation

Presented by: M. M. Lander, M. Mercurio, K. Hanley-Yanez, M. S. Sharbaugh, A. D. Althouse, M. A. Simon, J. J. Teuteberg, L. Lagazzi, C. M. Sciortino, C. McTiernan, R. Kormos, D. M. McNamara

 

Oral Session: Contemporary LVAD Trials – Same Old Song or New Tune?

0150 – ENDURANCE Destination Therapy Trial Outcomes as Stratified by Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) Classification

Presented by: S. V. Pamboukian, F. D. Pagani, J. J. Teuteberg, R. L. Kormos, C. C. Caldeira, C. H. Selzmann, J. K. Kirklin, B. B. Reid, E. C. McGee, C. A. Milano, J. G. Rogers

 

Oral Session: Contemporary Challenges in Pediatric Heart Transplant

0182 – Impact of Newly Detected Donor Specific Anti-HLA Antibody in the First Year After Pediatric Heart Transplantation

Presented by: A. I. Dipchand, S. Webber, K. Much, B. Feingold, C. Bentlejewski, E. D. Blume, R. Shaddy, C. Canter, J. Lamour, W. Mahle, W. Zuckerman, H. Diop, Y. Morrison, B. Armstrong, D. Ikle, J. Odim, A. Zeevi

 

Mini Oral Session: Novel Strategies and Mechanisms in Lung Preservation, Heart Failure and Assist Devices

0215 – Microvasculature Analysis Using Micro CTA Techniques for Lungs After Different Preservation Process

Presented by: S. Tane, K. Noda, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

Poster Session 2: Lung Transplantation

Poster Discussant: Christopher R. Ensor

 

0988 – A Prophylaxis-Free, Pre-Emptive Approach to the Management of CMV After Lung Transplantation: Single Center Results

Presented by: A. Bertani, P. Vitulo, A. Mularoni, P. Grossi, L. De Monte, E. Russo, M. Beretta, L. Martino, A. Callari

 

Poster Session 2: Nursing, Health Sciences, Allied Health

Poster Discussant: Annette J. Devito Dabbs

 

Friday, April 7

Sunrise Symposium: Contrasts and Similarities in Children and Adults: IPAH, Portopulmonary Hypertension, and Perioperative Management

Co-Chair: Brian Feingold

 

Symposium: Dealing with Antibodies Before and After Heart Transplant

Co-chair: Michael Shullo

 

Symposium: E-Health, Wearables, Social Media and Big Data in Transplantation: Fancy Toys or True Care Innovations?

The Importance of Involving End-Users When Designing Interactive Health Technology Applications for Self-Management Support

Presented by: Annette Devito Dabbs

 

New Ethical and Legal Challenges Surrounding E-health in Transplantation

Presented by: JiYeon Choi, PhD, RN

 

Oral Session: New and Improving? Evolving Outcomes with MCS

0266 – Which INTERMACS 4-7 Patients Are at Low Risk for Mortality at One Year? Insights from the INTERMACS Database

Presented by: J. J. Teuteberg, A. D. Althouse, M. Shullo, N. Kunz, K. Lockard, E. Dunn, L. Lagazzi, C. Sciortino, J. Cowger, S. Joseph, R. L. Kormos

 

Oral Session: Saved by the Bell: Overcoming Adherence and Frailty

0331 – A Trajectory Analysis of Adherence to Recommended Exercise Following Lung Transplantation

Presented by: M. Alrawashdeh, J. Choi, A. DeVito Dabbs

 

Oral Session: PATH to Better Outcomes: Diagnostics in Heart and Lung Transplantation

0346 – Late Graft Dysfunction After Pediatric Heart Transplantation Is Associated with Fibrosis and Decreased Capillary Density by Automated, Whole-Slide Imaging

Presented by: B. Feingold, J. Picarsic, A. Lesniak, M. Wood-Trageser, B. Popp, A. J. Demetris

 

Oral Session: Heart Failure in MCS

0355 – The Duration of Inotropic Support and Survival After Left Ventricular Assist Device

Presented by: E. Grandin, D. Mooney, K. Kennedy, M. S. Kiernan, R. D. Kociol, J. J. Teuteberg, F. D. Pagani, A. C. Gaffey, P. Atluri, E. Y. Birati, S. Myers, D. Naftel, G. Oliveira, K. E. Simpson, R. W. Yeh, J. K. Kirklin, R. L. Kormos, J. Rame

 

0356 – The Incidence of Early and Late Clinical Right Heart Failure and the Impact on Survival After Continuous Flow Mechanical Support: Insights from the New INTERMACS Definition of Right Heart Failure

Presented by: J. J. Teuteberg, G. Studdard, F. Pagani, M. Kiernan, G. Oliveria, E. Rame, P. Alturi, A. Gaffey, E. W. Grandin, J. Kirlin, S. Myers, C. Collum, R. L. Kormos

 

Mini Oral Session: Pediatric Heart Failure, MCS, and Peri-Transplant Issues

0416 – Post-Transplant Outcomes of Patients Supported with the Berlin Heart EXCOR as a Bridge to Transplantation: A Multi-Institutional Study

Presented by: A. Jeewa, M. Imamura, C. Canter, R. Niebler, C. VanderPluym, D. Rosenthal, J. K. Kirklin, M. Tresler, M. McMullan, V. Morell, M. Turrentine, R. Amedur1, K. Nguyen, K. Kanter, J. Conway, R. Gajarski, C. D. Fraser Jr

 

Mini Oral Session: Assessing and Managing the Failing Right Ventricle

0434 – Painting Profiles of Ambulatory Advanced Heart Failure: A Report from the REVIVAL Registry

Presented by: M. M. Kittleson, P. Shah, A. Lala, R. McLean, S. Pamboukian, D. Horstmanshof, J. Thibodeau, K. Shah, D. Lanfear, J. Teuteberg, W. Taddei-Peters, S. Khalatbari, L. Stevenson, D. Mann, K. Aaronson, G. Stewart

 

Mini Oral Session: Patient Centered Outcomes in Advanced Heart and Lung Disease

0456 – Most Survivors Are Glad to Have a VAD

Presented by: L. W. Stevenson, J. Lindenfeld, K. Grady, J. Vader, M. Givertz, D. Naftel, T. Baldwin, S. Myers, R. Kormos, J. K. Kirklin

 

0457 – Slower Gait Speed as a Measure of Frailty Tracks with INTERMACS Profiles, Quality of Life and Predicted Mortality in Ambulatory Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: A Report from the REVIVAL Registry

Presented by: A. Lala, A. Ambardekar, J. Estep, J. Stehlik, M. Mountis, D. Haas, D. Horstmanshof, J. Thibodeau, K. Shah, D. Lanfear, J. Teuteberg, W. Taddei-Peters, S. Khalatbari, L. Stevenson, D. Mann, K. Aaronson, G. Stewart

 

Poster Session 3: Basic Science & Translational Research

1147 – Pyroptosis of Passenger Leukocytes Negatively Impacts the Quality of Lung Grafts During Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion

Presented by: K. Noda, S. Tane, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

1151 – Optimal Perfusate Oxygenation During Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion Can Promote Alveolar Proliferation in Lung Grafts

Presented by: K. Noda, S. Tane, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

1154 – DUAL Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion Techniques Can Contribute to Better Posttransplant Outcomes Through Reconditioning Hypoxic Cells in Lung Grafts

Presented by: K. Noda, S. Tane, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

1155 – ST266 Improves Oxygenation and Reduces Tissue Injury in an In-Situ Rat Left Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Model

Presented by: C. F. Evans, X. Wang, X. Liu, R. Mishra, V. Mishra, S. Rahimpour, A. Zeevi, R. Banas, S. M. Pham

 

1160 – Bronchial Artery Sparing Lung Preservation: Is It Feasible?

Presented by: S. Tane, K. Noda, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

1161 – Nitrite Improves Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induced by Hypoxia/Reoxygenation in Lung Epithelial Cells: Implications for Ischemia-Reperfusion (I/R) Injury in Lung Transplantation

Presented by: A. Kumar, C. Corey, S. Shiva, M. T. Gladwin, J. D’Cunha

 

Poster Session 3: Heart Transplantation

1192 – Informative and Uninformative Variables in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients

Presented by: E. M. Hsich, L. Thuita, D. McNamara, J. G. Rogers, J. Schold, E. H. Blackstone, H. Ishwaran

 

Poster Session 3: Lung Transplantation

1244 – Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Death After Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease in Lung Transplantation

Presented by: C. A. Moore, J. Cheng, C. J. Iasella, A. R. Glanville, M. R. Morrell, R. B. Smith, J. Hayanga, J. F. McDyer, C. R. Ensor

 

1255 – Successful Maintenance Belatacept-Based Immunosuppression in Lung Transplantation Recipients Who Failed Calcineurin Inhibitors

Presented by: C. J. Iasella, R. J. Winstead, C. A. Moore, B. A. Johnson, M. R. Morrell, J. Hayanga, A. Zeevi, E. A. Lendermon, J. F. McDyer, C. R. Ensor

 

1263 – Increasing Tacrolimus Time-in-Therapeutic Range Is Associated with Reduced Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction

Presented by: C. A. Moore, K. M. Harrigan, C. J. Iasella, R. Venkataramanan, M. R. Morrell, J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, A. Zeevi, J. McDyer, C. R. Ensor

 

Poster Session 3: Mechanical Circulatory Support

1303 – Pre-Implant Under-Expression of CCR3 and Its Ligands Predicts One-Year Mortality in Left Ventricular Assist Device Patients

Presented by: A. Nayak, C. Neill, R. L. Kormos, L. Lagazzi, I. Halder, C. McTiernan, J. Larsen, A. Inashvili, J. Teuteberg, T. N. Bachman, K. Hanley-Yanez, D. M. McNamara, M. A. Simon

 

Saturday, April 8

Sunrise Symposium: Mechanical Circulatory Support – The Interface of Design and Outcome

Co-chair: R. Kormos

 

Sunrise Symposium: Extracorporeal Photopheresis: Shedding Light on Rejection?

Co-Chair: Matthew R. Morrell

 

Plenary Session 3

0496 – Advanced Therapy Utilization and Survival in Ambulatory Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: Results from the Medical Arm of Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (MedaMACS) Registry

Presented by: A. V. Ambardekar, M. Kittleson, M. Palardy, M. Mountis, R. Forde-McLean, A. DeVore, S. Pamboukian, J. Thibodeau, J. Teuteberg, L. Cadaret, R. Xie, L. Stevenson, G. Stewart

 

Oral Session: Not the Usual Suspects: Driving Outcomes in MCS

0500 – Temporal Patterns of Adverse Events (AE) Occurring within 60 Days of LVAD Implantation: The Concept of the AE Cascade

Presented by: J. O. Larsen, A. D. Althouse, J. J. Teuteberg, C. M. Sciortino, C. V. Nikas, L. F. Lagazzi, M. S. Sharbaugh, S. U. Iturra, N. M. Kunz, E. M. Dunn, K. L. Lockard, R. L. Kormos

 

Oral Session: Seeing the Patient Beyond the Device

0504 – Glad to Have a VAD Across Intermacs Profiles

Presented by: F. Pagani, M. Kittleson, G. Stewart, A. DeVore, M. Brinkley, S. Myers, M. Miller, D. Naftel, J. J. Teuteberg, L. W. Stevenson

 

Oral Session: Getting to the Heart of the Matter: Psychosocial Predict Outcomes in Transplant and MCS

0243 – Social and Clinical Characteristics Associated with Increased Short Term Mortality in Non-Inotrope Dependent Patients Undergoing Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy: Results from InterMACS

S. M. Joseph, R. L. Kormos, J. Teuteberg, A. Althouse, J. Cowger.

 

Oral Session: The Weighting Game: Impact of Obesity, Age, and Other Comorbidities in MCS

0471 – Adverse Events After Device Implantation Are More Common in Obese Patients: An IMACS Registry Analysis

Presented by: S. J. Forest, R. Xie, J. K. Kirklin, J. A. Cowger, Y. Xia, A. I. Dipchand, C. Sivathasan, C. Merry, L. H. Lund, R. Kormos, T. Nakatani, U. Jorde, D. J. Goldstein

 

Oral Session: Optimizing Early Outcomes after Lung Transplantation

0482 – Treatment of Antibody Mediated Rejection of the Lung Allograft with Carfilzomib-Based Therapy

Presented by: C. R. Ensor, A. Zeevi, S. A. Yousem, M. Mangiola, M. Marrari, M. R. Morrell, J. M. Pilewski, J. D’Cunha, J. F. McDyer

 

Oral Session: Influencing Long-term Outcomes in Lung Transplantation

0516 – Regulation of KLRG1 Gene Expression by T-bet Correlates with Human Cytomegalovirus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Effector Function

Presented by: A. Hoji, I. Popescu, M. Pipeling, H. Mannem, J. McDyer

UPMC Presbyterian Receives Highest National Honor for Organ Donor Enrollment Efforts

PITTSBURGH, July 15, 2014 UPMC Presbyterian was recognized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for reaching the gold level of achievement, the highest possible, for conducting activities that promoted enrollment in state organ donor registries. The hospital’s efforts over the past year were part of a national campaign known as the Workplace Partnership for Life Hospital Campaign led by HHS to increase donor enrollments in state registries nationwide.

UPMC conducted awareness and registry campaigns to educate staff, patients, visitors and community members about the critical need for organ, eye and tissue donors. The activities included passing out information in Pittsburgh’s Market Square, a parade of transplant recipients throughout the hospital, the annual UPMC Donate Life flag-raising ceremony and outreach efforts on social media. UPMC earned points for each activity implemented between June 2013 and May 2014.

“As transplant pioneers at UPMC, we recognize the importance of the gift of life and have always encouraged our clinicians, staff and members of the community to make the pledge to be an organ donor. We are grateful for the support of the Pittsburgh region in making our efforts a success,” said John Innocenti, president of UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside.

In all, 1,228 hospitals and transplant centers participated in the HHS campaign. Their combined efforts have added 327,659 donor enrollments to state registries nationwide since 2011, exceeding the HHS goal of 300,000. In Pennsylvania, more than 4.5 million people, or 46 percent of registered drivers, are registered organ donors.

UPMC works closely with the Center for Organ Recovery & Education, one of 58 federally designated not-for-profit organ procurement organizations in the United States, to promote organ donor awareness all year long.

For more than 30 years, UPMC has been providing care to adult and pediatric transplant patients through services at the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute, the UPMC Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and the Children’s Hillman Center for Pediatric Transplantation. Today, UPMC has performed more than 17,000 transplants, including heart, lung, intestinal, kidney, liver, pancreas and multiple-organ transplants, along with heart assist device implantation.

UPMC Patient First in U.S. Implanted with Hemolung Before Lifesaving Double Lung Transplant

PITTSBURGH, July 2, 2014 – Suffering from cystic fibrosis and rejecting the transplanted lungs he had gotten just two years ago, Jon Sacker, 33, came to UPMC from his hometown in Moore, Oklahoma, as a last resort. But when his carbon dioxide levels spiked, making him too sick for another transplant, his family feared the worst.

“I thought I had brought my husband here to die,” said Mr. Sacker’s wife, Sallie.

Instead, UPMC clinicians turned to a Pittsburgh-made device called the Hemolung Respiratory Assist System (RAS) that would filter out harmful carbon dioxide and provide healthy oxygen to his blood, giving Mr. Sacker a chance to gain enough strength to undergo a lifesaving transplant. In February, he became the first person in the U.S. to be implanted with the Hemolung RAS; in March, he underwent a double lung transplant and today is on the road to recovery.

“The entire series of events that led to this transplant and Jon’s recovery have been amazing,” said Christian Bermudez, M.D., chief of UPMC’s Division of Cardiothoracic Transplantation. “Jon had previously been very active and fit, and we knew we had to do whatever it took to help him.”

“Jon was in very critical condition when he came to Pittsburgh, and the Hemolung was a lifesaver for him while waiting for his second lung transplant. We are very proud of his good recovery,” said Mr. Sacker’s pulmonologist, Maria Crespo, M.D., associate medical director of UPMC’s Lung Transplant Program.

Many patients waiting for lungs or a heart use mechanical devices as a bridge to transplant. But doctors said Mr. Sacker was too sick for the traditional extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or ECMO. However, UPMC doctors knew about the Hemolung RAS, which removes carbon dioxide and delivers oxygen directly to the blood, allowing a patient’s lungs to rest and heal.

Several years before, William Federspiel, Ph.D., director of the Medical Devices Laboratory at the joint UPMC- and University of Pittsburgh-run McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, along with a designer fabricator and a bioengineering doctoral student, developed what was known as the Paracorporeal Respiratory Assist Lung. The device underwent product development and was commercialized by ALung Technologies as the renamed Hemolung RAS. ALung was founded by Dr. Federspiel and UPMC’s former chief of lung transplant, Brack G. Hattler, M.D.

“We had seen the Hemolung RAS used in other countries and wanted to do whatever we could to help this patient,” said Peter M. DeComo, chairman and chief executive of ALung Technologies.

Drs. Bermudez and Crespo worked with Diana Zaldonis, M.P.H., B.S.N., in the Division of Cardiac Surgery, to notify Food and Drug Administration officials of the intent to use the Hemolung RAS, which isn’t approved for use in the U.S., and to get emergency approval from the local hospital officials. Meanwhile, Mr. DeComo drove with another ALung official in the middle of the night to Toronto, where the closest Hemolung RAS was available.

“Jon’s story is a tremendous example of the depth of the work we do here every day. Most hospitals across the country couldn’t handle a situation as complex as Jon’s, but we can because of our collective experience and an extensive team that includes transplant surgeons, pulmonologists, nurses and so many more,” said James D. Luketich, M.D., chairman of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery. “

Mr. Sacker will remain in Pittsburgh for several months during his recovery, with his wife splitting her time between here and their hometown in Oklahoma. He said he’s looking forward to getting back home, where he had been a runner and public speaker spreading the word about the importance of organ donation after writing the book “Imperfect Perfection.”

“Out of all of the transplant centers we could have come to, we came here to Pittsburgh,” he said. “It’s a miracle that’s just not explainable. You just have to thank God.”

News Directors: Video is available of Mr. Sacker on the Hemolung RAS device at http://youtu.be/Uwe1-LN8P-4.

UPMC Performs 100 Lung Transplants for Eighth Consecutive Year

In 2013, the UPMC Lung Transplantation Program performed 100 lung transplants, an achievement that has set apart the program for eight consecutive years. This number exceeds many other transplant centers, making UPMC one of the most experienced lung transplantation programs in the country, with outcomes that continue to meet national standards.

The UPMC Lung Transplantation Program works within the UPMC Comprehensive Lung Center to provide exceptional care for patients with life-threatening lung diseases.

For more information, download the UPMC Lung Transplantation Program Referral Guide here.

UPMC Performs First “Breathing Lung” Transplant on East Coast Using OCS Lung

 PITTSBURGH, March 13, 2013 UPMC surgeons have performed a “breathing lung” transplant using a portable machine that provides a constant supply of blood and nutrients to the donor organs, which doctors say has the potential to keep them healthier and viable for longer than ever before. 

The double-lung transplant was performed March 4 at UPMC Presbyterian, using the Organ Care System, also known as the OCS lung, by TransMedics Inc. This is the first time the device has been used on the East Coast. The patient, a 53-year-old man from Moundsville, W.Va., had suffered from pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. He was in good condition Wednesday.

Traditionally, donor lungs are cooled and put on ice with no blood circulation, a process that essentially puts them to sleep. Once removed from a blood supply, though, the lungs can deteriorate rapidly, which can lead to complications for the recipient or, in some cases, the determination that the organs are no longer viable. Using the OCS device, the lungs are immediately placed in the machine after donation, where they are kept at body temperature and functioning while in transit to the recipient.

“Unfortunately, many people waiting for an organ transplant die because usable donor organs aren’t available. Using this method, we believe we can help more people and save lives,” said Christian Bermudez, M.D., UPMC’s chief of cardiothoracic transplantation who performed the transplant surgery and principal investigator of a study involving the OCS lung.

UPMC Surgeons hope to enroll 10 patients in the clinical trial, which will randomize five participants to get the OCS device and five to be treated using the traditional method of care. The goal is to assess whether perfusing the lungs in the machine will decrease the chances of early dysfunction of the transplanted organ, thus resulting in better long-term function for the recipient.

“This is an exciting technology breakthrough that has the potential to increase the organ donor pool and improve outcomes for those receiving these specially perfused lungs,” said James Luketich, M.D., chair of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery.

The OCS lung machine resembles a small cart on wheels. It can monitor the organ’s arterial pressure, gas exchange ratio, vascular resistance and other data through embedded sensors so doctors can get an immediate snapshot of the organ’s viability.

UPMC has a long history of innovation in transplantation, and surgeons have performed more than 3,000 heart and lung transplants. In 2007, UPMC surgeons were the first in the U.S. to perform a transplant in which a donor heart was maintained in a beating state for two hours and 45 minutes before being implanted into its recipient. That transplant used a similar perfusion machine developed for heart transplantation by TransMedics Inc.

A video with footage from the surgery and an interview with Dr. Bermudez will be available later today on YouTube and on the Inside Life Changing Medicine blog.  

About UPMC’s transplant programs
UPMC’s transplant programs are among the world’s largest and are internationally renowned for their influence on the field of transplantation. For more than 30 years, UPMC has been providing care to adult and pediatric transplant patients through services at the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute, the UPMC Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and the Children’s Hillman Center for Pediatric Transplantation. Today, UPMC has performed more than 17,000 transplants, including heart, lung, intestinal, kidney, liver, pancreas and multiple-organ transplants, along with heart assist device implantation. UPMC also partners with the University of Pittsburgh to advance basic science and clinically applied research, as well as to support the teaching and training of transplant specialists worldwide.