UPMC Physician Resources

Archives for UPMC

Neuro-Oncology Researcher at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Receives Grant from St. Baldrick’s Foundation

PrintGary Kohanbash, PhD, a neuro-oncology researcher at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, has been awarded a scholar grant of $298,000 from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a volunteer-driven charity dedicated to raising money for childhood cancer research.

These grants provide resources to institutions to conduct more research and enroll more children in ongoing clinical trials. Kohanbash and his team will look at improving immunotherapy for ependymomas, the third most common kind of brain tumor in children.

“As a scientist and a father, I am driven to help save kids from brain cancers, so I am very excited about the potential of immunotherapy. Unimaginable advances within the last 10 years are enabling us to create new, safer and more effective treatments,” said Kohanbash, who also is an assistant professor of neurological surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “With this funding from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, I am hopeful that we can bridge the gap between lab research and clinical care for kids with ependymomas.”

Kohanbash’s team has identified three peptides that might activate immune cells to specifically fight one of the more lethal types of ependymoma. He will be testing these peptides in the lab and also is looking at how immunotherapy could help fight all six types of ependymoma that affect kids.

“We are thrilled Dr. Kohanbash is receiving this grant based on his experience and accomplishments in the field of brain tumor immunology and his ongoing work to translate findings from the lab into promising treatments for children with ependymomas,” said Ian Pollack, MD, chief, Pediatric Neurosurgery, Children’s Hospital.

The grant is supported by the St. Baldrick’s Henry Cermak Fund for Pediatric Cancer Research.

For more information, please visit www.chp.edu.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Ranked Among Top Pediatric Hospitals in the United States

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC has once again been recognized as one of the top pediatric hospitals in the country, earning a spot on this year’s U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals.

It is the 8th consecutive year Children’s Hospital has appeared on the Best Children’s Hospitals list, which was released today.

“We are proud to be consistently recognized as one of the best children’s hospitals in the country,” said Christopher Gessner, president, Children’s Hospital. “It is rewarding for our physicians, nurses and support staff, who every day work together with skill and passion to provide the best care for children and adolescents with the most complex medical conditions.”

The Best Children’s Hospitals rankings highlight the top 50 US pediatric hospitals in each of 10 specialties: cancer; cardiology and heart surgery; diabetes and endocrinology; gastroenterology and GI surgery; neonatology; nephrology; neurology and neurosurgery; orthopedics; pulmonology; and urology.

Children’s is ranked 9th on the honor roll and is ranked in all 10 of the specialties.

The 2017-18 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings will be released online today and will be published in the “Best Hospitals 2018” guidebook, available in September.

The Best Children’s Hospitals rankings were introduced in 2007 to help families of children with rare or life-threatening illnesses find the best medical care available. The rankings open the door to an array of detailed information about each hospital’s performance.

The other hospitals named to the Honor Roll of Best Children’s Hospitals for 2017-18 are:

1. Boston Children’s Hospital
2. Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
3. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
4. Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston
5. John Hopkins Children’s Center, Baltimore
6. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
7. Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago
7. Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio
9. Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC
10. Children’s National Medical Center, Washington D.C.

Thomas Gleason, MD discusses Type B Aortic Dissection at the 2017 Society for Thoracic Surgery Annual Meeting

Thomas Gleason, MD, Chief, Division of Cardiac Surgery and Co-Director, UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute, hosted a panel discussion at the 2017 Society for Thoracic Surgery annual meeting in Houston, Texas, on the state of Type B Aortic Dissection including indications for intervention, device choices, and techniques from both European and US perspectives.
View the video here: Treating Type B Aortic Dissection: European and US Perspectives

American Thoracic Society 2017 Respiratory Heath Awardees — Steven Shapiro, MD, and Alison Morris, MD

SHAPIRO_STEVE_MD_EVP_20140204_004Steven Shapiro, MD and Alison Morris, MD have been named 2017 Respiratory Health Awardees by the American Thoracic Society (ATS). The Respiratory Health Awards will be presented at several events during the ATS conference. The 2017 American Thoracic Society Conference (ATS) will be held May 19-24 in Washington, DC.

Dr. Shapiro is receiving the Distinguished Achievement Award. The Distinguished Achievement Award is given to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to fighting respiratory disease through research, education, patient care, or advocacy.

Dr. Shapiro leads the Health Services Division as an executive vice president of UPMC, along with his overarching responsibility as chief medical and scientific officer for this integrated delivery and finance system.

In collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences and the UPMC Insurance Services Division, Dr. Shapiro is promoting evidence-based care pathways and population health models that position UPMC to provide the highest value and quality to patients.

MORRIS_ALISON_MD_PUL_AI_CC_20130131Dr. Morris is receiving the Recognition Award for Scientific Accomplishments. The Recognition Award for Scientific Accomplishments recognizes outstanding scientific contributions in basic or clinical research to enhance the understanding, prevention and treatment of respiratory disease or critical illness. Awardees are selected based on contributions made throughout their careers or for major contributions made at a particular point in their careers. Awardees will make a 25-minute presentation on their research.

Dr. Morris’ research interests include HIV-associated lung disease as well as the role of the microbiome in disease. Her group works with large cohort epidemiologic studies of HIV and other diseases as well as in translational studies in which physiologic and molecular techniques are applied to patient populations.

As part of her role in the Center for Medicine and the Microbiome, she works with collaborators in diverse areas studying the microbiome. Her clinical interests focus on lung disease in HIV-infected patients and in care of intensive care unit patients.

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Pulmonary Chief Elected Secretary-Treasurer of the American Thoracic Society

CELEDON_JUAN_MD_PDP_20131105_CSThe American Thoracic Society (ATS) has elected Juan C. Celedón, MD, DrPH, chief, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Allergy and Immunology at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, as its Secretary–Treasurer for the 2017–18 term.
Dr. Celedón will then assume the role of ATS President for the 2020 21 term and notably will be the first ATS president from the University of Pittsburgh, as well as the first Latino American to serve as ATS president, in the 115-year history of the society.

“I am deeply humbled and honored to have been elected as the Secretary-Treasurer of the American Thoracic Society, arguably the leading professional society in academic pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine worldwide,” said Dr. Celedón, Niels K. Jerne Professor of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “I hope to further the mission of the ATS in achieving respiratory health equality and workforce diversity, while continuing to pursue excellence in research, education and training, as well as clinical care of patients with pulmonary diseases, critical illnesses and sleep disorders.”

“On behalf of the ATS community, we wholeheartedly welcome Dr. Celedón to the elected leadership of the Society,” said David Gozal, MD, MBA, president of the ATS. “His previous achievements and recognition have clearly earned him this honor. We look forward to his future contributions to the ATS and to the field of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine both nationally and around the world.”

Dr. Celedón has been a member of the ATS since 1993. He received from the ATS the “Recognition Award for Scientific Accomplishments” in 2014, and was the first-ever recipient of the “Lifetime Award for Innovations in Health Equality” in 2015.

His research has focused on asthma and COPD, and on health disparities in airway diseases. His research, which has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, has been recognized with his election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians.

Dr. Celedón, who also serves as professor of Medicine, Epidemiology and Human Genetics at the University of Pittsburgh, will be installed as Secretary–Treasurer in May at the ATS 2017 International Conference in Washington, DC.

Founded in 1905, the American Thoracic Society is the world’s leading medical association dedicated to advancing pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The Society’s 15,000 members prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care and advocacy. The ATS publishes three journals, the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology and the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

For more information on Dr. Celedón, visit www.chp.edu.

2017 Update in Abdominal Transplantation Medicine and Surgery — May 12

UPMC Transplant Services, the UPMC Liver Cancer Center, and the UPMC Center for Liver Diseases will host the 2017 Update in Abdominal Transplantation Medicine and Surgery on Friday, May 12. The conference will be divided into two courses – a liver course and a kidney course and will provide health care professions an overview of current trends, management techniques, and new innovations and research to treat liver and kidney diseases.

Friday, May 12

Registration will begin at 7:30 a.m.

Fairmont Pittsburgh
510 Market St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Liver Topics:

•    Living-Donor Liver Transplant
Presented by: Abhinav Humar, MD

•    The Nuts and Bolts of the Liver Transplant
Presented by: Christopher Hughes, MD

•    Predictors of Mortality on the Liver Transplant Waiting List and Early Intervention
Presented by: Swaytha Ganesh, MD

•    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Non-invasive Evaluation and Treatment Options
Presented by: Jaideep Behari, MD, PhD

•    Intestinal Rehabilitation and Transplantation Solutions for Complex Gastrointestinal Problems
Presented by: Ruy Cruz, MD

 Kidney Topics:

•    Living-Donor Kidney Transplant
Presented by: Amit D. Tevar, MD

•    Antibodies: HLA Typing, CPRA, Crossmatching, and Antibody-Mediated Rejection
Presented by: Puneet Sood, MD, MPH

•    Kidney Transplantation for the Pediatric Patient
Presented by: Armando Ganoza,

•    Is My Patient a Candidate: Listing Elderly, Obese and Patients with Cancer
Presented by: Christine Wu, MD and Amit D. Tevar, MD

•    Long-term Medical Management of Renal Transplant Patient
Presented by: David J. Levenson, MD

Registration

For more information or to register, please visit UPMC.com/AbdominalTransplantConference2017.

The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) 37th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions — April 4-8, San Diego

The UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute and UPMC Cardiothoracic Transplant Department will be well-represented at the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) 37th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions in San Diego, Ca. Faculty research will be featured in both oral and poster presentations throughout the conference, including:

 

Tuesday, April 4

ACAD Core ID – ISHLT Academy: Core Competency Course in Infectious Diseases in Thoracic Transplantation and Mechanical Circulatory Support

SESSION 2: This Could Happen to You…Drug Interactions and Toxicity Errors to Avoid with Anti-infectives and Immunosuppression and Cracking the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Code

Presented by: Christopher R. Ensor

 

Wednesday, April 5

Opening Plenary Session

Co-Chair: Jeffrey J. Teuteberg

 

Symposium: When Should We Call It Quits? The Efficacy of Interventions to Ameliorate Psychosocial Risk Factors

When Do We Call It Quits: Intervention Strategies and Outcomes for Medical Non-Adherence

Presented by: Mary Amanda Dew

 

Are All Substances Made Equal?

Presented by: Andrea DiMartini

 

Oral Session: Cutting Edge Updates in Infectious Diseases

0039 – Clinical Risk Factors for Invasive Aspergillosis in Lung Transplant Recipients: Results of an International Cohort Study

Presented by: C. Aguilar, B. Hamandi, C. Fegbeutel, F. P. Silveira, E. A. Verschuuren, P. Ussetti, P. V. Chin-Hong, A. Sole, C. Holmes-Liew, E. M. Billaud, P. A. Grossi, O. Manuel, D. J. Levine, R. G. Barbers, D. Hadjiliadis, L. Singer, S. Husain

 

Oral Session: Bugs and Devices: A Bad Combination

0047 – Epidemiology of Fungal Infections (FI) in Mechanical Circulatory Support Device (MCSD) Recipients: Analysis of IMACS Registry 2013-2015

Presented by: O. Morrissey, R. Xie, J. Schaenman, S. Husain, M. Mooney, T. Nakatani, R. Kormos, M. Gómez-Bueno, S. Aslam, Y. Pya, M. Hannan

 

Symposium: Thinking Outside the Box: Extra-Pulmonary Management in Lung Transplantation

New Lungs – Old Sinuses: Friends or Foes?

Presented by: Joseph M. Pilewski

 

Mini Oral Session: Allocation, Bridging and Lung Allograft Assessment Strategies

0116 – Mechanical Ventilation and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) as a Combined Bridging Strategy to Lung Transplantation: Significant Gains in Survival

Presented by: A. L. Du, J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, M. Tuft, M. Morrell, N. Shigemura

 

Mini Oral Session: The Hardware of MCS

0131 – Association Between the Use of Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring and Outcomes with Percutaneous Left Ventricular Support: A Call for Standardization?

Presented by: J. J. Teuteberg, W. O’Neill

 

0132 – Analysis of Right Ventricular (RV) Regional and Global Systolic Function by Gated Blood Pool SPECT (GBPS) in Patients Undergoing Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Implantation

Presented by: C. B. Link, A. Nayak, P. Soman, M. A. Simon, J. J. Teuteberg, L. Lagazzi, A. Althouse, R. Kormos.

 

Poster Session 1: Heart Failure

0563 – Does Heart Failure with a Lower Ejection Fraction Mean Higher Costs? Insights from Data Analytics Across a Large Health Care System

Presented by: C. B. Link, S. Koscumb, P. Lynch, R. Ramani, M. Shullo, O. Marroquin, J. J. Teuteberg

 

0570 – Utilizing Data Analytics to Identify Patients at Highest Risk of Heart Failure Readmission

Presented by: C. B. Link, S. Koscumb, P. Lynch, R. Ramani, M. A. Shullo, O. Marroquin, J. J. Teuteberg

 

Poster Session 1: Junior Faculty Clinical Case Reports

0832 – Complications Following Lung Transplantation in a Patient with Short Telomere Syndrome

Presented by: C. Naik, M. Morrell

 

0847 – Successful Resolution of Refractory Rejection with Cyclophosphamide in a Lung Transplant Recipient Intolerant to Cell Cycle and Proliferation Signal Inhibitors

Presented by: C. A. Moore, M. R. Pipeling, C. R. Ensor

 

0865 – Pay Me Now or Pay Me Later: A Tale of Two Sensitized Pediatric Heart Transplant Candidates

Presented by: M. Mangiola, B. Feingold, D. Magnetta, S. West, S. Miller, M. Zinn, M. Marrari, A. Zeevi

 

Thursday, April 6

Sunrise Symposium: “Those Darn CARVs”: Community Acquired Respiratory Viruses in Lung Transplant

In the Pipeline: Novel Therapeutics

Presented by: Christopher Ensor

 

Symposium: Antibodies in Mechanical Circulatory Support: The Phantom Menace

Epidemiology and Risk of the Sensitized MCS Patient

Presented by: Michael Shullo

 

Symposium: Taming of the Shrew: Mycobacterium Abscessus in Lung Transplantation

Management of M. Abscessus in the Lung Transplant Candidate: Preparation for Transplantation

Presented by: Fernanda Silveira

 

Symposium: HLA, AMR and DSA – Approaching Antibodies in Kids

Before Transplant: Why the PRA Doesn’t Matter Anymore

Presented by: Brian Feingold

 

0225 – Neopterin Elevation and Survival Following Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation

Presented by: M. M. Lander, M. Mercurio, K. Hanley-Yanez, M. S. Sharbaugh, A. D. Althouse, M. A. Simon, J. J. Teuteberg, L. Lagazzi, C. M. Sciortino, C. McTiernan, R. Kormos, D. M. McNamara

 

Oral Session: Contemporary LVAD Trials – Same Old Song or New Tune?

0150 – ENDURANCE Destination Therapy Trial Outcomes as Stratified by Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) Classification

Presented by: S. V. Pamboukian, F. D. Pagani, J. J. Teuteberg, R. L. Kormos, C. C. Caldeira, C. H. Selzmann, J. K. Kirklin, B. B. Reid, E. C. McGee, C. A. Milano, J. G. Rogers

 

Oral Session: Contemporary Challenges in Pediatric Heart Transplant

0182 – Impact of Newly Detected Donor Specific Anti-HLA Antibody in the First Year After Pediatric Heart Transplantation

Presented by: A. I. Dipchand, S. Webber, K. Much, B. Feingold, C. Bentlejewski, E. D. Blume, R. Shaddy, C. Canter, J. Lamour, W. Mahle, W. Zuckerman, H. Diop, Y. Morrison, B. Armstrong, D. Ikle, J. Odim, A. Zeevi

 

Mini Oral Session: Novel Strategies and Mechanisms in Lung Preservation, Heart Failure and Assist Devices

0215 – Microvasculature Analysis Using Micro CTA Techniques for Lungs After Different Preservation Process

Presented by: S. Tane, K. Noda, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

Poster Session 2: Lung Transplantation

Poster Discussant: Christopher R. Ensor

 

0988 – A Prophylaxis-Free, Pre-Emptive Approach to the Management of CMV After Lung Transplantation: Single Center Results

Presented by: A. Bertani, P. Vitulo, A. Mularoni, P. Grossi, L. De Monte, E. Russo, M. Beretta, L. Martino, A. Callari

 

Poster Session 2: Nursing, Health Sciences, Allied Health

Poster Discussant: Annette J. Devito Dabbs

 

Friday, April 7

Sunrise Symposium: Contrasts and Similarities in Children and Adults: IPAH, Portopulmonary Hypertension, and Perioperative Management

Co-Chair: Brian Feingold

 

Symposium: Dealing with Antibodies Before and After Heart Transplant

Co-chair: Michael Shullo

 

Symposium: E-Health, Wearables, Social Media and Big Data in Transplantation: Fancy Toys or True Care Innovations?

The Importance of Involving End-Users When Designing Interactive Health Technology Applications for Self-Management Support

Presented by: Annette Devito Dabbs

 

New Ethical and Legal Challenges Surrounding E-health in Transplantation

Presented by: JiYeon Choi, PhD, RN

 

Oral Session: New and Improving? Evolving Outcomes with MCS

0266 – Which INTERMACS 4-7 Patients Are at Low Risk for Mortality at One Year? Insights from the INTERMACS Database

Presented by: J. J. Teuteberg, A. D. Althouse, M. Shullo, N. Kunz, K. Lockard, E. Dunn, L. Lagazzi, C. Sciortino, J. Cowger, S. Joseph, R. L. Kormos

 

Oral Session: Saved by the Bell: Overcoming Adherence and Frailty

0331 – A Trajectory Analysis of Adherence to Recommended Exercise Following Lung Transplantation

Presented by: M. Alrawashdeh, J. Choi, A. DeVito Dabbs

 

Oral Session: PATH to Better Outcomes: Diagnostics in Heart and Lung Transplantation

0346 – Late Graft Dysfunction After Pediatric Heart Transplantation Is Associated with Fibrosis and Decreased Capillary Density by Automated, Whole-Slide Imaging

Presented by: B. Feingold, J. Picarsic, A. Lesniak, M. Wood-Trageser, B. Popp, A. J. Demetris

 

Oral Session: Heart Failure in MCS

0355 – The Duration of Inotropic Support and Survival After Left Ventricular Assist Device

Presented by: E. Grandin, D. Mooney, K. Kennedy, M. S. Kiernan, R. D. Kociol, J. J. Teuteberg, F. D. Pagani, A. C. Gaffey, P. Atluri, E. Y. Birati, S. Myers, D. Naftel, G. Oliveira, K. E. Simpson, R. W. Yeh, J. K. Kirklin, R. L. Kormos, J. Rame

 

0356 – The Incidence of Early and Late Clinical Right Heart Failure and the Impact on Survival After Continuous Flow Mechanical Support: Insights from the New INTERMACS Definition of Right Heart Failure

Presented by: J. J. Teuteberg, G. Studdard, F. Pagani, M. Kiernan, G. Oliveria, E. Rame, P. Alturi, A. Gaffey, E. W. Grandin, J. Kirlin, S. Myers, C. Collum, R. L. Kormos

 

Mini Oral Session: Pediatric Heart Failure, MCS, and Peri-Transplant Issues

0416 – Post-Transplant Outcomes of Patients Supported with the Berlin Heart EXCOR as a Bridge to Transplantation: A Multi-Institutional Study

Presented by: A. Jeewa, M. Imamura, C. Canter, R. Niebler, C. VanderPluym, D. Rosenthal, J. K. Kirklin, M. Tresler, M. McMullan, V. Morell, M. Turrentine, R. Amedur1, K. Nguyen, K. Kanter, J. Conway, R. Gajarski, C. D. Fraser Jr

 

Mini Oral Session: Assessing and Managing the Failing Right Ventricle

0434 – Painting Profiles of Ambulatory Advanced Heart Failure: A Report from the REVIVAL Registry

Presented by: M. M. Kittleson, P. Shah, A. Lala, R. McLean, S. Pamboukian, D. Horstmanshof, J. Thibodeau, K. Shah, D. Lanfear, J. Teuteberg, W. Taddei-Peters, S. Khalatbari, L. Stevenson, D. Mann, K. Aaronson, G. Stewart

 

Mini Oral Session: Patient Centered Outcomes in Advanced Heart and Lung Disease

0456 – Most Survivors Are Glad to Have a VAD

Presented by: L. W. Stevenson, J. Lindenfeld, K. Grady, J. Vader, M. Givertz, D. Naftel, T. Baldwin, S. Myers, R. Kormos, J. K. Kirklin

 

0457 – Slower Gait Speed as a Measure of Frailty Tracks with INTERMACS Profiles, Quality of Life and Predicted Mortality in Ambulatory Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: A Report from the REVIVAL Registry

Presented by: A. Lala, A. Ambardekar, J. Estep, J. Stehlik, M. Mountis, D. Haas, D. Horstmanshof, J. Thibodeau, K. Shah, D. Lanfear, J. Teuteberg, W. Taddei-Peters, S. Khalatbari, L. Stevenson, D. Mann, K. Aaronson, G. Stewart

 

Poster Session 3: Basic Science & Translational Research

1147 – Pyroptosis of Passenger Leukocytes Negatively Impacts the Quality of Lung Grafts During Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion

Presented by: K. Noda, S. Tane, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

1151 – Optimal Perfusate Oxygenation During Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion Can Promote Alveolar Proliferation in Lung Grafts

Presented by: K. Noda, S. Tane, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

1154 – DUAL Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion Techniques Can Contribute to Better Posttransplant Outcomes Through Reconditioning Hypoxic Cells in Lung Grafts

Presented by: K. Noda, S. Tane, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

1155 – ST266 Improves Oxygenation and Reduces Tissue Injury in an In-Situ Rat Left Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Model

Presented by: C. F. Evans, X. Wang, X. Liu, R. Mishra, V. Mishra, S. Rahimpour, A. Zeevi, R. Banas, S. M. Pham

 

1160 – Bronchial Artery Sparing Lung Preservation: Is It Feasible?

Presented by: S. Tane, K. Noda, A. J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, J. D. Luketich, N. Shigemura

 

1161 – Nitrite Improves Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induced by Hypoxia/Reoxygenation in Lung Epithelial Cells: Implications for Ischemia-Reperfusion (I/R) Injury in Lung Transplantation

Presented by: A. Kumar, C. Corey, S. Shiva, M. T. Gladwin, J. D’Cunha

 

Poster Session 3: Heart Transplantation

1192 – Informative and Uninformative Variables in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients

Presented by: E. M. Hsich, L. Thuita, D. McNamara, J. G. Rogers, J. Schold, E. H. Blackstone, H. Ishwaran

 

Poster Session 3: Lung Transplantation

1244 – Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Death After Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease in Lung Transplantation

Presented by: C. A. Moore, J. Cheng, C. J. Iasella, A. R. Glanville, M. R. Morrell, R. B. Smith, J. Hayanga, J. F. McDyer, C. R. Ensor

 

1255 – Successful Maintenance Belatacept-Based Immunosuppression in Lung Transplantation Recipients Who Failed Calcineurin Inhibitors

Presented by: C. J. Iasella, R. J. Winstead, C. A. Moore, B. A. Johnson, M. R. Morrell, J. Hayanga, A. Zeevi, E. A. Lendermon, J. F. McDyer, C. R. Ensor

 

1263 – Increasing Tacrolimus Time-in-Therapeutic Range Is Associated with Reduced Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction

Presented by: C. A. Moore, K. M. Harrigan, C. J. Iasella, R. Venkataramanan, M. R. Morrell, J. Hayanga, J. D’Cunha, A. Zeevi, J. McDyer, C. R. Ensor

 

Poster Session 3: Mechanical Circulatory Support

1303 – Pre-Implant Under-Expression of CCR3 and Its Ligands Predicts One-Year Mortality in Left Ventricular Assist Device Patients

Presented by: A. Nayak, C. Neill, R. L. Kormos, L. Lagazzi, I. Halder, C. McTiernan, J. Larsen, A. Inashvili, J. Teuteberg, T. N. Bachman, K. Hanley-Yanez, D. M. McNamara, M. A. Simon

 

Saturday, April 8

Sunrise Symposium: Mechanical Circulatory Support – The Interface of Design and Outcome

Co-chair: R. Kormos

 

Sunrise Symposium: Extracorporeal Photopheresis: Shedding Light on Rejection?

Co-Chair: Matthew R. Morrell

 

Plenary Session 3

0496 – Advanced Therapy Utilization and Survival in Ambulatory Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: Results from the Medical Arm of Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (MedaMACS) Registry

Presented by: A. V. Ambardekar, M. Kittleson, M. Palardy, M. Mountis, R. Forde-McLean, A. DeVore, S. Pamboukian, J. Thibodeau, J. Teuteberg, L. Cadaret, R. Xie, L. Stevenson, G. Stewart

 

Oral Session: Not the Usual Suspects: Driving Outcomes in MCS

0500 – Temporal Patterns of Adverse Events (AE) Occurring within 60 Days of LVAD Implantation: The Concept of the AE Cascade

Presented by: J. O. Larsen, A. D. Althouse, J. J. Teuteberg, C. M. Sciortino, C. V. Nikas, L. F. Lagazzi, M. S. Sharbaugh, S. U. Iturra, N. M. Kunz, E. M. Dunn, K. L. Lockard, R. L. Kormos

 

Oral Session: Seeing the Patient Beyond the Device

0504 – Glad to Have a VAD Across Intermacs Profiles

Presented by: F. Pagani, M. Kittleson, G. Stewart, A. DeVore, M. Brinkley, S. Myers, M. Miller, D. Naftel, J. J. Teuteberg, L. W. Stevenson

 

Oral Session: Getting to the Heart of the Matter: Psychosocial Predict Outcomes in Transplant and MCS

0243 – Social and Clinical Characteristics Associated with Increased Short Term Mortality in Non-Inotrope Dependent Patients Undergoing Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy: Results from InterMACS

S. M. Joseph, R. L. Kormos, J. Teuteberg, A. Althouse, J. Cowger.

 

Oral Session: The Weighting Game: Impact of Obesity, Age, and Other Comorbidities in MCS

0471 – Adverse Events After Device Implantation Are More Common in Obese Patients: An IMACS Registry Analysis

Presented by: S. J. Forest, R. Xie, J. K. Kirklin, J. A. Cowger, Y. Xia, A. I. Dipchand, C. Sivathasan, C. Merry, L. H. Lund, R. Kormos, T. Nakatani, U. Jorde, D. J. Goldstein

 

Oral Session: Optimizing Early Outcomes after Lung Transplantation

0482 – Treatment of Antibody Mediated Rejection of the Lung Allograft with Carfilzomib-Based Therapy

Presented by: C. R. Ensor, A. Zeevi, S. A. Yousem, M. Mangiola, M. Marrari, M. R. Morrell, J. M. Pilewski, J. D’Cunha, J. F. McDyer

 

Oral Session: Influencing Long-term Outcomes in Lung Transplantation

0516 – Regulation of KLRG1 Gene Expression by T-bet Correlates with Human Cytomegalovirus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Effector Function

Presented by: A. Hoji, I. Popescu, M. Pipeling, H. Mannem, J. McDyer

Magee’s Pregnancy Recovery Center Expands to Aid Expectant Mothers Struggling with Opioid Dependency

In 2014, the Pregnancy Recovery Center (PRC) at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC became one of the country’s first programs to provide concurrent treatment for opioid dependency as well as prenatal care and delivery. Through the support of a Centers of Excellence (COE) grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services, the PRC has expanded to five new locations in three counties, providing comprehensive services for expectant mothers closer to home. Patients can now be seen in Butler, Clairton, Beaver, Natrona Heights and Monroeville, and all deliveries take place at Magee.

“The benefit of being able to remain close to home while managing their pregnancy and treatment cannot be underestimated for these women. With this COE grant, we are now able to bring the expertise of our PRC specialists to patients in outlying areas where these services are needed the most to continue to reduce the impact that opioid addiction has on mothers and babies throughout western Pennsylvania,” said Patty Genday, executive director of women’s services, Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC.

All PRC patients are prescribed buprenorphine—which is effective for converting patients off opioids—or another opioid replacement, on an outpatient basis. Treatment also includes behavioral counseling, clinic visits and consultations with social workers, in addition to routine prenatal check-ups. Counseling services at the new PRC locations are conducted in conjunction with regional behavioral health providers.

“Treatment for addiction is most effective when integrated with treatment for physical and mental health as well as social services. Most people with substance use disorders, particularly opioid use disorder, also have a daunting array of other health and psychological problems,” said Antoine Douaihy, MD, senior academic director of addiction medicine services at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC. “This comprehensive program provides treatment of substance use disorder and any related psychiatric disorders that are highly prevalent in pregnant women. Treating one improves outcomes in treating the other.”

Research suggests that pregnant women using buprenorphine instead of methadone recover faster after birth, and babies experience fewer side effects. Sixty percent of babies born at Magee to mothers treated with methadone require medication for withdrawals, whereas only 35 percent of newborns whose mothers received treatment from the PRC require medication.

“For many women, pregnancy enhances their chances of overcoming their opioid dependency,” said Michael England, MD, director of the PRC. “We are offering women and their babies an opportunity to move forward.”

McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine Faculty Member Publication Named a NIEHS Top Paper of 2016

The National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), recently honored its 2016 Papers of the Year—the top 25 of 2700 publications.

In that elite group, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine faculty member Fabrisia Ambrosio, PhD, MPT, Director of Rehabilitation for UPMC International and an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh, and her team were recognized for their paper entitled “Arsenic promotes NF-kB-mediated fibroblast dysfunction and matrix remodeling to impair muscle stem cell function,” published in the journal Stem Cells.

McGowan Institute faculty member Donna Stolz, PhD, Associate Director of the Center for Biologic Imaging, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and an Associate Professor in the Departments of Cell Biology and Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh, is a co-author on the study.

The paper’s abstract reads:

Arsenic is a global health hazard that impacts over 140 million individuals worldwide. Epidemiological studies reveal prominent muscle dysfunction and mobility declines following arsenic exposure; yet, mechanisms underlying such declines are unknown. The objective of this study was to test the novel hypothesis that arsenic drives a maladaptive fibroblast phenotype to promote pathogenic myomatrix remodeling and compromise the muscle stem (satellite) cell (MuSC) niche. Mice were exposed to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic in drinking water before receiving a local muscle injury. Arsenic-exposed muscles displayed pathogenic matrix remodeling, defective myofiber regeneration and impaired functional recovery, relative to controls. When naïve human MuSCs were seeded onto three-dimensional decellularized muscle constructs derived from arsenic-exposed muscles, cells displayed an increased fibrogenic conversion and decreased myogenicity, compared with cells seeded onto control constructs. Consistent with myomatrix alterations, fibroblasts isolated from arsenic-exposed muscle displayed sustained expression of matrix remodeling genes, the majority of which were mediated by NF-κB. Inhibition of NF-κB during arsenic exposure preserved normal myofiber structure and functional recovery after injury, suggesting that NF-κB signaling serves as an important mechanism of action for the deleterious effects of arsenic on tissue healing. Taken together, the results from this study implicate myomatrix biophysical and/or biochemical characteristics as culprits in arsenic-induced MuSC dysfunction and impaired muscle regeneration. It is anticipated that these findings may aid in the development of strategies to prevent or revert the effects of arsenic on tissue healing and, more broadly, provide insight into the influence of the native myomatrix on stem cell behavior.

Women Less Likely to be Academic Grand Rounds Speakers than Men

Women are less likely than men to be chosen as speakers during grand rounds, the academic mainstay of expert-delivered lectures used to share patient-care guidelines and cutting-edge research within clinical departments. Those findings by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine were published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Despite women comprising 47 percent of medical students, 46 percent of residents and 36 percent of faculty nationwide, only 26 percent of grand rounds speakers were women. Across clinical specialties, grand rounds speakers were 44 percent less likely than medical students, 39 percent less likely than residents, and 21 percent less likely than faculty to be women. Additionally, speakers invited from outside institutions were less likely to be women than those invited to speak at grand rounds from among an institution’s own personnel.

“The people at the podiums do not resemble the people in the audience,” said Julie Boiko, MD, MS, who led the study while a medical student at the Pitt School of Medicine. “While gender representation and equality in medicine has been an important area of student discussion in recent years, this is the first time we have data to support that there may be a gender bias in speaker selection at academic grand rounds.”

Data for the JAMA research letter was collected from nine major clinical specialties and 79 medical schools and academic hospitals. In total, researchers analyzed more than 200 grand rounds websites and calendar listings for speaker series, as well as more than 7,000 individual sessions for speaker gender and institutional affiliations.

As follow up to this study, researchers plan to identify specific factors associated with having greater gender balance on grand rounds speaker rosters.

“We were surprised by the consistency of this underrepresentation across most specialties and the discovery that speakers invited from outside a given institution are less likely to be women than speakers invited from within the institution,” said Alyce Anderson, coauthor of the study and an MD/PhD. candidate at the Pitt School of Medicine. “With this data, speaker planning committees, departments and institutions can strive for gender representation that approximates that of individual clinical specialties’ faculty and/or trainees. Such efforts may have a positive effect on retaining women in the academic medical workforce.”

Boiko currently is a resident physician in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. Additional coauthor Rachael Gordon is an MD/PhD student at the Pitt School of Medicine.

Page 1 of 72:1 2 3 4 »Last »