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Ann E. Thompson, M.D., to Become Next Vice Dean of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

PITTSBURGH, Aug. 1, 2014 – Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs Ann E. Thompson, M.D., will become vice dean of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine on Oct. 1.

In this role, Dr. Thompson will serve as a senior deputy to Arthur S. Levine, M.D., Pitt’s senior vice chancellor for the health sciences and John and Gertrude Petersen Dean of the School of Medicine, in the management and advancement of the medical school.

“Dr. Thompson’s many achievements include building and maintaining successful clinical and academic programs with exceptional records for fellowship training and research productivity,” Dr. Levine said. “She has held leadership roles as a medical school administrator and in her clinical field of critical care medicine, and has consistently advocated for the recruitment and promotion of outstanding women at Pitt and in academic medicine as a whole.”

Dr. Thompson is professor and vice chair (professional development) of the Department of Critical Care Medicine and medical director for clinical resource management at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC. She served as chief of pediatric critical care from 1981 to 2009 and was interim chair of the Department of Critical Care Medicine from 2006 to 2008. She is a past president of the Society of Critical Care Medicine — only the second woman to hold that position — and she is a senior editor of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.

“I look forward to this new challenge and the chance to contribute to the continued growth and success of our premier medical school,” Dr. Thompson said. “Living up to the standards set by my predecessor, Dr. Steven Kanter, will be a major challenge, but the faculty, students and staff here are truly exceptional, and I am confident we will continue along the same world-class trajectory he helped so much to establish.”

Dr. Thompson received her bachelor of arts in biology from the University of Chicago in 1969 and her medical degree from Boston’s Tufts University School of Medicine in 1974. After completing her pediatric residency training at the Tufts New England Medical Center and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), she trained in anesthesiology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and did a fellowship in pediatric critical care and research at CHOP, which is where she held her first faculty position. In 2003, she received a master’s degree in health care policy and management from Carnegie Mellon University.

Dr. Thompson succeeds Steven L. Kanter, M.D., who will become dean of the medical school at the University of Missouri-Kansas City on Oct. 1.

“During his 12-year tenure as vice dean, Dr. Kanter has become an international expert in medical education and curriculum innovation, and has created a culture of collaborative learning and support for our medical students and faculty alike,” Dr. Levine said. “While we will miss him greatly, we are delighted that he has earned this wonderful opportunity to implement his well-honed leadership skills, experience and creativity as the dean of a medical school.”

Surgical, Other Advances Made at UPMC Improve Graft Survival of Intestinal, Multi-Visceral Transplant Patients

SAN FRANCISCO, July 30, 2014 – Innovations in surgical techniques, drugs and immunosuppression have improved survival after intestinal and multi-visceral transplants, according to a retrospective analysis of more than 500 surgeries done at UPMC over nearly 25 years.

The study was led by Goutham Kumar, M.D., a transplant surgery fellow at UPMC’s Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute. Dr. Kumar was recognized for his work with the Young Investigator Award by the 2014 World Transplant Congress and presented his findings at the group’s July 26 to 31 meeting in San Francisco.

“UPMC has led the way in the development of new surgical techniques and important research involving transplantation, and our analysis shows that our innovations have made a real difference to patients,” Dr. Kumar said.

The researchers examined 541 intestinal and multi-visceral transplants done at UPMC from 1990 to 2013. The total consisted of 228 pediatric transplants and 313 adult transplants; 252 were intestine-only transplants, 157 were liver-intestine, 89 were full multi-visceral, and 43 were modified multi-visceral. A majority of the pediatric patients suffered from gastroschisis, followed by volvulus and necrotizing entercolitis. The adult patients needed transplants because of thrombosis, Crohn’s disease or some kind of obstruction.

Researchers analyzed several outcomes and found that pre-conditioning with certain immunosuppressants, the time the graft is outside of the body, certain blood types and a disparity in the gender of donor and recipient were among the factors predicting graft survival.

Co-authors on the study are George Mazariegos, M.D., Guillerme Costa, M.D., Gaurav Gupta, M.D., Dolly Martin, Geoff Bond, M.D., Kyle Soltys, M.D., Rakesh Sindhi, M.D., Abhinav Humar, M.D., and Hiroshi Sogawa, M.D., all of either the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC or UPMC.

In addition to Dr. Kumar, six other UPMC and University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences researchers were recognized this year with Young Investigator Awards by the World Transplant Congress. They and their presentations are:

Aravind Cherukuri, M.D., Ph.D.
“Transitional B Cell (TrB) T1/T2 Ratio is a Marker for Graft Dysfunction in Human Kidney Transplant Recipients (KTRs)”

Vinayak Rohan, M.D.
“Outcomes of Liver Transplantation for Unresectable Liver Malignancy in Children”

Qing Ding, Ph.D.
“TIM-1 Signaling is Required for Maintenance and Induction of Regulatory B Cells Through Apoptotic Cell Binding or TIM-1 Ligation”

Kanishka Mohib, Ph.D.
“TIM-4 Expression by C Cells Identifies an Inflammatory B Effector 1 Subset that Promotes Allograft Rejection and Inhibits Tumor Metastases”

Dalia Raich-Regue, Ph.D.
“Myeloid Dendritic Cell-Specific mTORC2 Deficiency Enhances Alloreactive Th1 and Th17 Cell Responses and Skin Graft Rejection”

Tripti Singh, M.D.
“B Cell Depletion of Naïve Recipients Enhances Graft Reactive T Cell Responses”

Children’s Brain Care Institute Expert Receives Grant for Mitochondrial Disease Research

PITTSBURGH, July 28, 2014 — The United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation (UMDF) recently awarded nearly $500,000 in grants to researchers investigating potential treatments for mitochondrial disease. The research grant awards were presented at the UMDF’s annual symposium, Mitochondrial Medicine 2014: Pittsburgh.

Michael Bell, MD, of the Brain Care Institute (BCI) at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, received a grant of $25,000 for his project, “Improving CNS delivery of brain antioxidants after acute metabolic decompensation in mitochondrial disease,” which will investigate a combination of two FDA-approved drugs for their effectiveness in treating children and young adults with Leigh’s Syndrome. This work has the potential to improve brain function in patients with a mitochondrial disease for which there are currently no proven treatments. Dr. Bell is working on this project with Amy Goldstein, MD, of the Division of Child Neurology, and Bob Clark, MD, and Hülya Bayir, MD, from the Department of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, who all are part of the Brain Care Institute.

Dr. Bell is also director of Pediatric Neurocritical Care and the Pediatric Neurotrauma Center at Children’s. He is associate director of Pediatric Neurointensive Care and Perinatal Brain Injury at the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research at the University of Pittsburgh, and associate professor of Critical Care Medicine and Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

The UMDF is the largest, non-governmental contributor of grants focused on mitochondrial disease research. Since 1996, the UMDF has funded more than $13 million dollars in research projects.

UPMC Clinicians Win Beckwith Institute Grants to Engage Patients, Improve Care

PITTSBURGH, July 25, 2014 –To experiment with changes big and small that might better engage patients and improve health care, The Beckwith Institute recently awarded 11 new grants to UPMC clinicians and other staff.

The wide-ranging projects include an effort to develop a shared decision-making tool for family members of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) and the creation of an interactive, Web-based “thermometer” to monitor the mood and energy of adolescents with bipolar disorder.

Supported by UPMC Chairman G. Nicholas Beckwith and his wife, Dotty, with matching funds from UPMC, the Beckwith Institute annually provides grants to improve clinical outcomes by empowering both clinicians and patients to explore innovative ways of transforming health care.

“Through the inspiring leadership and generous financial assistance of Nick and Dotty Beckwith, we are able to empower clinicians and other staff to experiment with new methods for transforming care delivery,” said Tami Minnier, UPMC chief quality officer. “At the heart of every project chosen for this program is an emphasis on engaging and educating patients and families so that they can play a meaningful role in the health care decisions that affect them.”

The grants are administered through two complementary efforts: The Frontline Innovation Program, which focuses on improving the patient bedside experience, and the Clinical Transformation Program, which supports comprehensive redesign of processes to put the involvement of the patient and their loved ones at the core.

The projects awarded 2014-2015 grants include:

  • a novel “mood and energy” tracking application for patients with pediatric bipolar disorder
  • a mobile application that allows patients to track and navigate the complex organ transplant process
  • a Web-based communication and decision support tool to improve the quality of shared decision-making in the ICU and to prepare family members for the role of surrogate decision maker
  • use of personal health monitoring devices for elderly patients with heart disease to promote patient engagement and prevent complications
  • an effort to assess patients for readmission risk and to ensure appropriate outreach after hospital discharge
  • resources to engage pediatric patients in diabetes care
  • standardization of sexual assault care at UPMC facilities
  • an asthma education program for children that includes a nurse hotline and online patient portal
  • a decision-making tool to help patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease make informed treatment decisions
  • development of a protocol that can be used to safely identify and discharge blunt trauma patients who have sustained no significant injury
  • a multidisciplinary effort to reduce unnecessary hospital readmissions for patients with complex health needs

UPMC-Developed Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients

PITTSBURGH, July 24, 2014 – The routine use of a molecular testing panel developed at UPMC greatly increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for patients with thyroid nodules and cancer, report researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with UPMC CancerCenter.

The test, available at the UPMC/UPCI Multidisciplinary Thyroid Center and other diagnostic testing agencies, improved the chances of patients getting the correct initial surgery by 30 percent, according to the study published this month in the Annals of Surgery.

“Before this test, about one in five potential thyroid cancer cases couldn’t be diagnosed without an operation to remove a portion of the thyroid,” said lead author Linwah Yip, M.D., assistant professor of surgery in Pitt’s School of Medicine and UPMC surgical oncologist.  Previously, “if the portion removed during the first surgery came back positive for cancer, a second surgery was needed to remove the rest of the thyroid. The molecular testing panel now bypasses that initial surgery, allowing us to go right to fully removing the cancer with one initial surgery. This reduces risk and stress to the patient, as well as recovery time and costs.”

Cancer in the thyroid, which is located in the “Adam’s apple” area of the neck, is now the fifth most common cancer diagnosed in women.  Thyroid cancer is one of the few cancers that continues to increase in incidence, although the five-year survival rate is 97 percent.

Previously, the most accurate form of testing for thyroid cancer was a fine-needle aspiration biopsy, where a doctor guides a thin needle to the thyroid and removes a small tissue sample for testing. However, in 20 percent of these biopsies, cancer cannot be ruled out. A lobectomy, which is a surgical operation to remove half of the thyroid, is then needed to diagnose or rule-out thyroid cancer. In the case of a postoperative cancer diagnosis, a second surgery is required to remove the rest of the thyroid.

Researchers have identified certain gene mutations that are indicative of an increased likelihood of thyroid cancer, and the molecular testing panel developed at UPMC can be run using the sample collected through the initial, minimally invasive biopsy, rather than a lobectomy. When the panel shows these mutations, a total thyroidectomy is advised.

Dr. Yip and her colleagues followed 671 UPMC patients with suspicious thyroid nodes who received biopsies. Approximately half the biopsy samples were run through the panel, and the other half were not. Patients whose tissue samples were not tested with the panel had a 2.5-fold higher statistically significant likelihood of having an initial lobectomy and then requiring a second operation.

“We’re currently refining the panel by adding tests for more genetic mutations, thereby making it even more accurate,” said co-author Yuri Nikiforov, M.D., Ph.D., professor in the Department of Pathology at Pitt and director of thyroid molecular diagnostics at the UPMC/UPCI Multidisciplinary Thyroid Center. “Thyroid cancer is usually very curable, and we are getting closer to quickly and efficiently identifying and treating all cases of thyroid cancer.”

In 2009, the American Thyroid Association (ATA) revised its guidelines to add that doctors may consider the use of molecular markers when the initial biopsy is inconclusive.

“The ATA is currently revising those guidelines to take into account the latest research, including our findings,” said senior author Sally Carty, M.D., Pitt professor of surgery, co-director of the UPMC/UPCI Multidisciplinary Thyroid Center and recent president of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons. “The molecular testing panel holds promise for streamlining and eliminating unnecessary surgery not just here but nationwide.”

A previous study led by Dr. Yip showed the panel to be cost-saving when used to help in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

Each year, approximately half of the 25,000 patients assessed at UPMC’s Multidisciplinary Thyroid Center are found to have thyroid conditions, and more than 900 thyroid operations are performed by the center’s surgeons. The center aims to provide patients with one-stop evaluation from thyroid experts in a variety of fields, including surgery and endocrinology.

Additional researchers on this study are Laura I. Wharry, M.D., Michaele J. Armstrong, Ph.D., Ari Silbermann, B.S., Kelly L. McCoy, M.D., and Michael T. Stang, M.D., all of the Pitt Department of Surgery; Nobuyuki P. Ohori, M.D., and Marina N. Nikiforov, M.D., all of the Pitt Department of Pathology; Shane O. LeBeau, M.D., Christopher Coyne, M.D., and Steven P. Hodak, M.D., all of the Pitt Department of Endocrinology; Julie E. Bauman, M.D., of the PItt Department of Hematology/Oncology; Jonas T. Johnson, M.D., of the Pitt Department of Otolaryngology; and Mitch E. Tublin, M.D., of the Pitt Department of Radiology.

This study was funded by a grant from UPMC.

Pitt Innovation Challenge Poses New Health Care Questions, Looks for Promising Solutions

PITTSBURGH, July 23, 2014 – In the second competition of its kind, the University of Pittsburgh will award up to $375,000 to teams of creative thinkers who have fresh ideas to solve tough, health-related problems.

As in the previous Pitt Innovation Challenge (PInCh), the University of Pittsburgh Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), in collaboration with the university’s Office of the Provost and the Innovation Institute, also will provide winning teams with project managers to implement their plans.

The next challenge seeks answers to the question, “From cell to community:  How can we individualize solutions for better health(care)?” Solutions could involve personalizing the medical experience; tailoring treatments for a specific disease using genetic information; leveraging family history or other individually unique data; and developing patient-focused interventions.

“The success of the first PInCh showed that scientists and other community members can come up with creative approaches to tackle difficult problems,” said CTSI director Steven Reis, M.D., who also is associate vice chancellor for clinical research, health sciences, and a professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “The competition provides a way of making good ideas a reality.”

Since their selection at a public judging event in May, the funded teams from the first PInCh have been making great progress with their projects, Dr. Reis noted. “We’re delighted to support these kinds of efforts and are eager to see the impact they will have on the health of our community.”

The first step in the competition requires submitting a two-minute video by Sept. 15 that introduces the team, defines the health problem that is being tackled and briefly outlines the creative solution. Early round winners will be invited to a final round of judging on Nov. 12 at a public event in which teams will make short presentations to a panel of judges.

“We look at PInCh as a new way to leverage the talent and drive here at the University of Pittsburgh in collaboration with partners outside the university,” said John Maier, M.D., Ph.D., PInCH program director. “We want to ask hard questions that traditional academic efforts have struggled to solve and give anyone who is interested and enthusiastic a chance to come up with better solutions.”

Teams that bring together collaborators from different perspectives, institutions and disciplines are encouraged, but at least one member of the team must be a Pitt faculty member. If needed, PInCh organizers will help community members connect with a member of the faculty. The solution could be a device, a software application, an intervention strategy or any other approach the team identifies.

For more information and to register a team, go to www.pinch.pitt.edu.

Telemedicine Effective in Delivering International Cardiac Care, Children’s Hospital Study Shows

PITTSBURGH, July 22, 2014 – After studying more than 1,000 pediatric consultations offered in Latin America through telemedicine, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC found that physicians in those countries were highly satisfied with Children’s service and believed telemedicine had improved patient outcomes.

The study, led by Ricardo A. Muñoz, M.D., FAAP, FCCM, FACC, chief, Cardiac Intensive Care Division, at Children’s, was published online in the July issue of Telemedicine and e-Health.

“Lack of skilled physicians is a widespread problem, particularly those with expertise in patients with complex medical problems, such as congenital heart disease,” said Dr. Muñoz, also medical director, Global Business and Telemedicine, at Children’s. “The use of telemedicine services within pediatric cardiac intensive care units (CICUs) can be used as an assisting technology, allowing more expertise and knowledge to be shared with remote centers in need.”

Although a growing body of evidence suggests that telemedicine is associated with improved patient outcomes, the technology remains a relatively new tool in health care, particularly in pediatric critical care. In surveying the Latin American centers, the Children’s researchers hope to design a common approach for future tele-consultations.

“Little is known about the optimal method of telemedicine service delivery in the international setting,” said Dr. Muñoz. “Ideally, a consistent approach should be used for centers with similar organizations, skill level and patient populations. One size does not fit all.”

The study showcased Children’s unusual multicenter experience in telemedicine at three hospitals in Colombia and one in Mexico from July 2011 to June 2013. Children’s physicians provided 1,040 consultations for 476 patients, with a real-time intervention taking place in 23 percent of those encounters, including echocardiography, adjustment of pacemaker settings and pharmacologic therapy. In 6 percent of the tele-consultations, a different diagnosis was suggested based on the interpretation of cardiac or imaging studies.

The number and type of patients seen by Children’s e-CICU were selected by local physicians at each hospital. Although Children’s physicians in Pittsburgh did not have remote access to the children’s electronic medical records, relevant patient data was provided in a secure database and telemedicine hardware was used for real-time consultations. A CICU physician from Children’s participated in all the encounters, with some being joined by other specialists, including cardiac surgeons and neonatal intensivists.

Based on anonymous surveys of physicians participating at the international centers, 96 percent of respondents reported being satisfied or highly satisfied with the telemedicine service, while 58 percent rated the promptness and time dedicated by the tele-intensivist as very high. Physicians reported that they changed their clinical practice sometimes in relation to the telemedicine encounters, with changes in surgical management noted most frequently.

“We know that telemedicine-assisted pediatric cardiac critical care is technologically and logistically feasible in the international arena,” said Dr. Muñoz. “And now we know that the physicians we assist internationally consider this technology to be useful for patient outcomes and education. With continuing improvements in telemedicine technology and our own practices, we will continue to expand access to the world’s best health care for children around the world.”

Children’s Hospital is leading the way in the development of telemedicine services to meet the needs of young patients regionally and around the world. The state-of-the-art video conferencing technologies provide complex pediatric cardiac care through remote and virtual examinations — whenever and wherever expertise is needed. Experts from Children’s CICUs currently oversee international programs and provide consultations and care management in Cali, Bucaramanga and Medellin, all in Colombia, as well as in Mexico City, Mexico.

For more information on telemedicine services, please visit www.chp.edu/CHP/international+services+telemedicine.

Pitt-led Study Suggests Cystic Fibrosis is Two Diseases, One Doesn’t Affect Lungs

PITTSBURGH, July 17, 2014 – Cystic fibrosis (CF) could be considered two diseases, one that affects multiple organs including the lungs, and one that doesn’t affect the lungs at all, according to a multicenter team led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The research, published online today in PLOS Genetics, showed that nine variants in the gene associated with cystic fibrosis can lead to pancreatitis, sinusitis and male infertility, but leave the lungs unharmed.

People with CF inherit from each parent a severely mutated copy of a gene called CFTR, which makes a protein that forms a channel for the movement of chloride molecules in and out of cells that produce sweat, mucus, tears, semen and digestive enzymes, said co-senior investigator David Whitcomb, M.D., Ph.D., chief of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition, Pitt School of Medicine. Without functional CFTR channels, secretions become thick and sticky, causing problems such as the chronic lung congestion associated with CF.

“There are other kinds of mutations of CFTR, but these were deemed to be harmless because they didn’t cause lung problems,” Dr. Whitcomb said. “We examined whether these variants could be related to disorders of the pancreas and other organs that use CFTR channels.”

Co-senior author Min Goo Lee, M.D., Ph.D., of Yonsei University College of Medicine in Seoul, Korea, conducted careful tests of CFTR in pancreatic cell models and determined that a molecular switch inside the cell called WINK1 made CFTR channels secrete bicarbonate rather than chloride molecules.

“Pancreas cells use CFTR to secrete bicarbonate to neutralize gastric acids,” Dr. Whitcomb said. “When that doesn’t happen, the acids cause the inflammation, cyst formation and scarring of severe pancreatitis.”

The research team found nine CFTR gene variants associated with pancreatitis after testing nearly 1,000 patients with the disease and a comparable number of healthy volunteers. They also learned that each variant could impair the WINK1 switch to prevent CFTR from becoming a bicarbonate-secreting channel.

Co-senior author Ivet Bahar, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor and John K. Vries Chair of Computational Biology, Pitt School of Medicine, built a computer model of the CFTR protein’s structure and determined that all the nine variants alter the area that forms the bicarbonate transport channel, thus impairing secretion of the molecule.

“It turns out that CFTR-mediated bicarbonate transport is critical to thin mucus in the sinuses and for proper sperm function,” Dr. Whitcomb said. “When we surveyed pancreatitis patients, there was a subset who said they had problems with chronic sinusitis. Of men over 30 who said they had tried to have children and were infertile, nearly all had one of these nine CFTR mutations.”

He added that identification of the mechanisms that cause the conditions make it possible to develop treatments, as well as to launch trials to determine if medications that are used by CF patients might have some benefit for those who do not have lung disease, but who carry the other mutations.

The team includes researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, the Mayo Clinic, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and many other institutions that are part of the North American Pancreatitis Study Group.

The study was supported by National Institutes of Health grants DK061451, DK062420, GM086238, DK063922, CA047904 and RR024153; the Ministry for Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea; and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Seoul.

UPMC Presbyterian Receives Highest National Honor for Organ Donor Enrollment Efforts

PITTSBURGH, July 15, 2014 UPMC Presbyterian was recognized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for reaching the gold level of achievement, the highest possible, for conducting activities that promoted enrollment in state organ donor registries. The hospital’s efforts over the past year were part of a national campaign known as the Workplace Partnership for Life Hospital Campaign led by HHS to increase donor enrollments in state registries nationwide.

UPMC conducted awareness and registry campaigns to educate staff, patients, visitors and community members about the critical need for organ, eye and tissue donors. The activities included passing out information in Pittsburgh’s Market Square, a parade of transplant recipients throughout the hospital, the annual UPMC Donate Life flag-raising ceremony and outreach efforts on social media. UPMC earned points for each activity implemented between June 2013 and May 2014.

“As transplant pioneers at UPMC, we recognize the importance of the gift of life and have always encouraged our clinicians, staff and members of the community to make the pledge to be an organ donor. We are grateful for the support of the Pittsburgh region in making our efforts a success,” said John Innocenti, president of UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside.

In all, 1,228 hospitals and transplant centers participated in the HHS campaign. Their combined efforts have added 327,659 donor enrollments to state registries nationwide since 2011, exceeding the HHS goal of 300,000. In Pennsylvania, more than 4.5 million people, or 46 percent of registered drivers, are registered organ donors.

UPMC works closely with the Center for Organ Recovery & Education, one of 58 federally designated not-for-profit organ procurement organizations in the United States, to promote organ donor awareness all year long.

For more than 30 years, UPMC has been providing care to adult and pediatric transplant patients through services at the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute, the UPMC Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and the Children’s Hillman Center for Pediatric Transplantation. Today, UPMC has performed more than 17,000 transplants, including heart, lung, intestinal, kidney, liver, pancreas and multiple-organ transplants, along with heart assist device implantation.

UPMC Named to U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll of ‘Best Hospitals’ for 15th Time

UPMC Ranks #1 in Pennsylvania, #1 in Pittsburgh for Clinical Excellence

PITTSBURGH, July 15, 2014 UPMC has once again received national recognition for its clinical expertise, earning 12th position on the annual U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll of America’s “Best Hospitals.” UPMC is the highest-ranked medical center in both Pennsylvania and in Pittsburgh.

“While we’re very proud that UPMC was recognized for the 15th year, it is our patients who are the ultimate winners. Our exceptionally skilled and devoted health care professionals do what they do best every day — provide the finest health care in the state and in the region,” said Leslie C. Davis, president, UPMC Hospital and Community Services Division.

“We are honored to receive this national distinction, which recognizes UPMC’s unique combination of high-quality medical care, a top health insurance plan, and close affiliation with the University of Pittsburgh, one of the best medical schools in the country,” added Steven Shapiro, M.D., executive vice president and chief medical and scientific officer at UPMC. “Furthermore, it emphasizes UPMC’s commitment to our patients and showcases how we are leading the way in the development of new technologies and methods of care.”

Nationally, UPMC is ranked for excellence in 15 of 16 specialty areas, and is among the top 10 hospitals in six specialties: ear, nose and throat; gastroenterology; gynecology; psychiatry; pulmonology; and rheumatology.

U.S. News analyzed 4,743 medical centers in the nation, but only those that achieved high scores in six or more specialties were included in the distinguished Honor Roll group. Scores were based on a variety of factors including hospital volume, patient safety, outcomes and reputation for delivering high-quality care.

Last month, U.S. News named its 2014 Honor Roll of America’s Best Children’s Hospitals, recognizing Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC as 9th in the country.

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