UPMC Physician Resources

Association of Academic Physiatrists Honors Pitt/UPMC Physician

Michael Boninger, M.D., director of the UPMC Rehabilitation Institute and professor and chair of the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, received the 2016 Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP) Distinguished Academician Award at the association’s annual meeting Friday in Sacramento, Calif. Each year, the AAP honors one academic physiatrist who has achieved distinction and peer recognition regionally or nationally for outstanding performance in teaching, research or administration.

“I feel very lucky to work in a field where I have the opportunity to help people. The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC have provided me the opportunity, support and collaborators to excel in this pursuit,” Dr. Boninger said.

The author of four U.S. patents, Dr. Boninger is recognized for his extensive research on spinal cord injury, assistive technology and overuse injuries, particularly those associated with manual wheelchair propulsion.

Dr. Boninger earned his medical degree at Ohio State University. He completed residencies at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan Medical Center, where he became the chief resident, physical medicine and rehabilitation. He came to the University of Pittsburgh when he won a postdoctoral fellowship in engineering and rehabilitation technology in 1994.

The AAP Distinguished Academician Award was established in 1995. Dr. Boninger is the first faculty member from Pitt’s Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation to win this national award.

Chief of Hematology/Oncology at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Selected for Pediatric Cancer MoonShot Consortium

PrintLinda McAllister-Lucas, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, has been selected as a member of the prestigious Pediatric Cancer MoonShot Consortium.

The announcement was made at the Cancer MoonShot 2020 press conference held this week in Phoenix.

Dr. McAllister-Lucas is an internationally recognized expert in lymphoma whose research has provided new insights into the molecular basis of these types of cancers.

The Cancer MoonShot 2020 Program is a cancer collaborative initiative seeking to accelerate the potential of combination immunotherapy as the next-generation standard of care for cancer patients. This group aims to explore a new paradigm in cancer care by initiating randomized Phase II trials involving 20,000 patients with 20 tumor types within the next 36 months. These findings will inform Phase III trials and the aspirational “moonshot” to develop effective, vaccine-based immunotherapies to combat cancer by 2020.

The newly formed consortium will focus on bringing the promise of immunotherapy to children diagnosed with the disease. The group will seek to apply the most comprehensive diagnostic testing available—whole genomic and proteomic analysis—and leverage proven and promising combination immunotherapies and clinical trials under the QUantitative, Integrative Lifelong Trial (QUILT) Program within the Cancer MoonShot 2020 mission.

“Less than 1 percent of cancers in the United States occur in pediatric patients. And yet, the loss of years and quality of life to pediatric cancer is huge,” said Dr. McAllister-Lucas, also an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “The Cancer MoonShot 2020 will pour resources into research investigating the cause, the diagnosis and the treatment of pediatric cancers. This MoonShot will start a new era of hope for our patients and their families, and will lead the way toward more effective, less toxic treatments, and higher quality, longer lives for children with cancer.”

Dr. McAllister-Lucas is one of 10 members from various academic centers across the United States to be included in the consortium. Other centers include: Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago; Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Aflac Cancer & Blood Disorders Center; Children’s Hospital of Orange County; Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; Duke Department of Pediatrics – Duke University School of Medicine; Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah and Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital; Phoenix Children’s Hospital; and Sanford Health.

The Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Children’s provides diagnosis, treatment and follow-up for children, adolescents and young adults with cancer and blood disorders. The division is the largest, most comprehensive pediatric cancer and blood disease center in western Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio and northern West Virginia and has been a member of the Children’s Oncology Group, a multi-institutional pediatric cancer research organization sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, since 1961.

For more information on Dr. McAllister-Lucas, visit www.chp.edu.

Lantern raises $17M to provide accessible online mental health wellness services; partners with healthcare leader UPMC

Lantern, the leader in evidence-based online mental health wellness services, today announced the close of a $17 million investment led by Pittsburgh-based healthcare giant UPMC. The investment reflects a commitment from Lantern and UPMC to transform the way emotional wellbeing services are delivered and accessed in the U.S. UPMC was joined by all previous Lantern investors, including Mayfield Fund, SoftTech Venture Capital and Stanford University.

As a leading mental health provider and research organization, UPMC will partner with Lantern to leverage its platform within a myriad of clinical settings and conditions.

“We are excited about reaching more people with behavioral health issues through this readily accessible, scalable, and cost-effective platform,” said Tal Heppenstall, president of UPMC Enterprises, the commercialization arm of UPMC, which spearheaded this investment. “This partnership is an excellent example of our mission at UPMC Enterprises: finding creative solutions and technologies to solve some of the most challenging problems in healthcare.”

UPMC, one of the largest integrated healthcare delivery systems in the U.S., is “the ideal partner,” said Alejandro Foung, Lantern co-founder and CEO. “UPMC has a unique view into the continuum of care, from insuring more than 2.8 million individuals, to administering care preventatively and when patients need it most through its more than 20 hospitals and 3,500 employed physicians,” said Foung. “A large part of UPMC’s appeal to Lantern is its focus on disease prevention, a sharp contrast to the fee-for-service model that currently dominates the behavioral health landscape. Because of our shared focus on prevention to solve health challenges before they even arise or manifest, Lantern and UPMC are the perfect match.”

Behavioral health problems are among the most pressing health issues facing the country, affecting more than 18 percent of adults. Depression and anxiety disorders are among the top five drivers of medical costs in primary care settings—and are even more common and costly among those with chronic medical conditions. Given the shortage of mental health workers, two-thirds of primary care physicians report difficulty referring patients to behavioral health services.

UPMC clinicians will work with Lantern on pilots aimed at expanding its programs to additional behavioral health issues and potentially to populations of patients with more complex conditions. “Integrating behavioral health into broader medical care and focusing on prevention for large groups of patients is the only way that we can deliver high-quality, cost-effective mental healthcare,” said Eva Szigethy, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry, pediatrics, and medicine at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, who will be working closely with the Lantern team.

The largest nongovernmental employer in Pennsylvania, UPMC integrates 60,000 employees, more than 20 hospitals, more than 500 doctors’ offices and outpatient sites, a health insurance division, and international and commercial operations. Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences, UPMC ranks No. 13 in the prestigious U.S. News & World Report annual Honor Roll of America’s Best Hospitals.

Building on UPMC’s 20-year track record of successful commercialization activity, UPMC Enterprises is dedicated to creating exceptional healthcare innovations that will have a measurable impact on the cost and quality of care. By partnering with innovators like Lantern, UPMC Enterprises is focused on creating and commercializing solutions in four key areas: clinical tools that will transform the delivery of care, population health management that will be essential in health care’s move from volume to value, consumer-centric healthcare, and business services that improve efficiency.

Some Chronic Viral Infections Could Contribute to Cognitive Decline with Aging

Certain chronic viral infections could contribute to subtle cognitive deterioration in apparently healthy older adults, according to a study led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University that was recently published in the journal Alzheimer’s Disease and Associated Disorders.

Many cross-sectional studies, which capture information from a single time point, have suggested a link between exposure to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses (HSV) 1 and 2, as well as the protozoa Toxoplasma gondii and decreased cognitive functioning, said lead investigator Vishwajit Nimgaonkar, M.D., professor of psychiatry, Pitt School of Medicine.

“Our study is one of the few to assess viral exposure and cognitive functioning measures over a period of time in a group of older adults,” he said. “It’s possible that these viruses, which can linger in the body long after acute infection, are triggering some neurotoxic effects.”
The researchers looked for signs of viral exposures in blood samples that were collected during the “Monongahela-Youghiogheny Healthy Aging Team” (MYHAT) study, in which more than 1,000 participants 65 years and older were evaluated annually for five years to investigate cognitive change over time.

They found CMV, HSV-2 or toxoplasma exposure is associated with different aspects of cognitive decline in older people that could help explain what is often considered to be age-related decline.

“This is important from a public health perspective, as these infections are very common and several options for prevention and treatment are available,” noted senior investigator Mary Ganguli, M.D., M.P.H., professor of psychiatry at Pitt. “As we learn more about the role that infectious agents play in the brain, we might develop new prevention strategies for cognitive impairment.”

Now, the researchers are trying to determine if there are subgroups of people whose brains are more vulnerable to the effects of chronic viral infection.

Structure of Brain Plaques in Huntington’s Disease Described by Pitt Team

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have shown that the core of the protein clumps found in the brains of people with Huntington’s disease have a distinctive structure, a finding that could shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative disorder. The findings were published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In Huntington’s and several other progressive brain diseases, certain proteins aggregate to form plaques or deposits in the brain, said senior investigator Patrick C.A. van der Wel, Ph.D., assistant professor of structural biology, Pitt School of Medicine.

“Despite decades of research, the nature of the protein deposition has been unclear, which makes it difficult to design drugs that affect the process,” he said. “Using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we were able to provide an unprecedented view of the internal structure of the protein clumps that form in the disease, which we hope will one day lead to new therapies.”

The gene associated with Huntington’s makes a protein that has a repetitive sequence called polyglutamine. In the 1990s, it was discovered that the patients have mutated proteins in which this sequence is too long, yet it has remained unclear how exactly this unusual mutation causes the protein to misbehave, clump together and cause the disease.

“This is exciting because it may suggest new ways to intervene with these disease-causing events,” Dr. van der Wel said. “For the first time, we were able to really look at the protein structure in the core of the deposits formed by the mutant protein that causes Huntington’s. This is an important breakthrough that provides crucial new insights into the process of how the protein undergoes misfolding and aggregation.

He added Huntington’s is one of many neurodegenerative diseases in which unusual protein deposition occurs in the brain, suggesting similar biochemical mechanisms may be involved. Lessons learned in this disease could help foster understanding of how these types of diseases develop, and what role the protein aggregates play.

The team included Cody L. Hoop, Ph.D., Hsiang-Kai Lin, Ph.D., Karunakar Kar, Ph.D., Jennifer C. Boatz, Abhishek Mandal, and Ronald Wetzel, Ph.D., all of the University of Pittsburgh; Gábor Magyarfalvi, Ph.D., of Eötvös University, Hungary; and Jonathan Lamley and Józef R. Lewandowski, Ph.D., of Warwick University, U.K.

The project was funded by National Institutes of Health grants GM112678, AG019322, GM099718 and GM088119; National Center for Research Resources grant RR024153; the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council; and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

Sedentary Behavior Linked to Poor Health in Adults with Severe Obesity, Independent of Exercise

Sedentary behavior is associated with poor cardiovascular health and diabetes in adults with severe obesity, independent of how much exercise they perform, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led study showed for the first time.

The finding, published online and scheduled for the March issue of the journal Preventive Medicine, could be used to design and test programs for adults with severe obesity that emphasize reducing time spent sitting, rather than immediately working toward increased moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity or exercise, such as brisk walking. In the U.S., 15 percent of adults have severe obesity, placing them at high risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, and premature mortality.

“Adults with severe obesity often have difficultly following national guidelines to participate in at least 30 minutes per day of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity for health benefits,” said lead author Wendy C. King, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Pitt Public Health. “Our findings suggest that replacing sedentary behavior, like watching television or sitting at the computer, with low-intensity physical activities, such as light housework or going for a casual stroll, may improve cardiometabolic health in this population.”

In addition, Dr. King and her colleagues determined that defining “sedentary time” as 10 minutes or more without walking yielded stronger associations between sedentary behavior and cardiometabolic health compared to allowing sedentary time to be as short as one minute, which has been the norm in the field.

“This is important because accurate assessment of sedentary behavior is crucial to being able to evaluate if and how this behavior is related to health outcomes. If our estimate of sedentary behavior is poor, we may not detect true associations,” said Dr. King.

She and her colleagues followed 927 patients participating in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 , a prospective study of patients undergoing weight-loss surgery at one of 10 different hospitals across the U.S. For a one-week period before surgery, the research team measured the participants’ activity—or lack of activity—using monitors that tracked the number of steps taken each minute.

For every hour per day participants spent in sedentary bouts of at least 10 minutes, their odds of having diabetes increased by 15 percent, metabolic syndrome by 12 percent and elevated blood pressure by 14 percent, and their waist circumference was a half inch larger, after adjusting for their sex, age, household income, smoking status, alcohol use, depressive symptoms, body mass index (BMI) and time spent in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity.

“These findings indicate the importance of investigating sedentary behavior as a distinct health risk behavior, not simply lack of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, among adults with severe obesity,” said Dr. King. “This ultimately may inform physical activity guidelines for this special population.”

Future research is needed to determine whether replacing sedentary behavior with low-intensity physical activity is an effective approach to preventing and managing cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in adults with severe obesity, and evaluate strategies to help this population make such lifestyle changes.

Additional investigators on this research are Jia-Yuh Chen, M.S., Anita P. Courcoulas, M.D., M.P.H., Steven H. Belle, Ph.D., M.Sc.Hyg., all of Pitt; James E. Mitchell, M.D., and Brian Cook, Ph.D., both of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute; Bruce M. Wolfe, M.D., of the Oregon Health & Science University; Emma J. Patterson, M.D., of the Legacy Good Samaritan Weight Management Institute in Portland, Ore.; William B. Inabet, M.D., of Mount Sinai Hospital in New York; Gregory F. Dakin, M.D., of Weill Cornell Medical College; David R. Flum, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Washington.

This clinical study was a cooperative agreement funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, Grant number DCC -U01 DK066557; Columbia – U01-DK66667 (in collaboration with Cornell University Medical Center CTRC, Grant UL1-RR024996); University of Washington – U01-DK66568 (in collaboration with CTRC, Grant M01RR-00037); Neuropsychiatric Research Institute – U01-DK66471; East Carolina University – U01-DK66526; UPMC – U01-DK66585 (in collaboration with CTRC, Grant UL1-RR024153); and Oregon Health & Science University – U01-DK66555.

One Hookah Tobacco Smoking Session Delivers 25 Times the Tar of a Single Cigarette

As cigarette smoking rates fall, more people are smoking tobacco from hookahs—communal pipes that enable users to draw tobacco smoke through water. A new meta-analysis led by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine shows that hookah smokers are inhaling a large load of toxicants.

The findings, published online and scheduled for the January/February print issue of the journal Public Health Reports, represent a meta-analysis, or a mathematical summary of previously published data. The research team reviewed 542 scientific articles potentially relevant to cigarette and hookah smoking and ultimately narrowed them down to 17 studies that included sufficient data to extract reliable estimates on toxicants inhaled when smoking cigarettes or hookahs.

They discovered that, compared with a single cigarette, one hookah session delivers approximately 125 times the smoke, 25 times the tar, 2.5 times the nicotine and 10 times the carbon monoxide.

“Our results show that hookah tobacco smoking poses real health concerns and that it should be monitored more closely than it is currently,” said lead author Brian A. Primack, M.D., Ph.D., assistant vice chancellor for health and society in Pitt’s Schools of the Health Sciences. “For example, hookah smoking was not included in the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey System questionnaire, which assesses cigarette smoking, chewing tobacco, electronic cigarettes and many other forms of substance abuse.”

Dr. Primack and his co-authors note that comparing a hookah smoking session to smoking a single cigarette is a complex comparison to make because of the differences in smoking patterns. A frequent cigarette smoker may smoke 20 cigarettes per day, while a frequent hookah smoker may only participate in a few hookah sessions each day.

“It’s not a perfect comparison because people smoke cigarettes and hookahs in very different ways,” said Dr. Primack. “We had to conduct the analysis this way—comparing a single hookah session to a single cigarette—because that’s the way the underlying studies tend to report findings. So, the estimates we found cannot tell us exactly what is ‘worse.’ But what they do suggest is that hookah smokers are exposed to a lot more toxicants than they probably realize. After we have more fine-grained data about usage frequencies and patterns, we will be able to combine those data with these findings and get a better sense of relative overall toxicant load.”

The research team also notes that these findings may be helpful in providing estimates for various official purposes.

“Individual studies have reported different estimates for inhaled toxicants from cigarettes or hookahs, which made it hard to know exactly what to report to policy makers or in educational materials,” said co-author and expert in meta-analysis Smita Nayak, M.D., research scientist at the Swedish Center for Clinical Research and Innovation. “A strength of meta-analysis is that it enables us to provide more precise estimates by synthesizing the currently available data from individual studies.”

These estimates come at an important time: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that, for the first time in history, past 30-day use of hookah tobacco was higher than past 30-day use of cigarettes among U.S. high school students. Additionally, about one-third of U.S. college students have smoked tobacco from a hookah, and many of those individuals were not previous users of other forms of tobacco.

Additional authors on this study are Mary V. Carroll, R.N., B.S.N., of the Squirrel Hill Health Center in Pittsburgh; Patricia M. Weiss, M.L.I.S., Ariel Shensa, M.A., and Steven T. Farley, B.S., all of Pitt; Alan L. Shihadeh, Sc.D., of American University of Beirut; Michael J. Fine, M.D., M.Sc., of the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System; and Thomas Eissenberg, Ph.D., of the Virginia Commonwealth University.

This research was funded by National Cancer Institute grant R01-CA140150.

Officials Announce New Chair of Pediatrics at Pitt and Scientific Director of Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

PrintTerence S. Dermody, MD, has been named the new chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and physician-in-chief and scientific director at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

Dr. Dermody will officially begin on June 1. He joins Children’s Hospital from Vanderbilt University, where he is the Dorothy Overall Wells Professor of Pediatrics, director of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, and director of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He also is a professor of pathology, microbiology and immunology at Vanderbilt.

“Terry Dermody is a world renowned researcher, compassionate physician, visionary leader and just an all-around first class person,” said Christopher Gessner, president, Children’s Hospital. “We are thrilled that he will be joining our team as we continue to grow our clinical and research programs and make Children’s the place to be for pediatric physicians and physician scientists to launch and build their careers.”

Dr. Dermody is a virologist with interests in viral pathogenesis and vaccine development. He has focused mainly on reovirus, an important experimental model for studies of viral encephalitis in infants, and on chikungunya virus, an arthropod-borne virus that causes epidemics of febrile arthritis.

The work in Dr. Dermody’s lab has encompassed several inter-related themes including the structural basis of viral attachment and cell entry, mechanisms of genome replication and packaging, patterns of cell signaling and gene expression occurring in response to viral infection, mechanisms of virus-induced apoptosis and its significance in the viral life cycle, and the role of viral receptor distribution and utilization in disease pathology. Currently, the lab is developing viral vectors for oncolytic and vaccine applications.

“Dr. Dermody came highly recommended by leaders in our Department of Pediatrics,” noted Arthur S. Levine, M.D., senior vice chancellor for the health sciences and John and Gertrude Petersen Dean of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh. “His academic interests, which included running Vanderbilt’s M.D./Ph.D. training program, are unusually broad. An exceptional physician and scientist, he will be an asset to our faculty, residents and students.”

“I am honored to be able to join the team in Pittsburgh and be a part of this world-class pediatric facility dedicated to improving the lives of children,” said Dr. Dermody. “I am eager to begin and have the opportunity to work with the talented physicians and scientists at Children’s Hospital. I feel honored and humbled to have this opportunity.”

Dr. Dermody succeeds David H. Perlmutter, M.D., who recently left Children’s to become executive vice chancellor for medical affairs and dean of medicine at Washington University in St. Louis.

Dr. Dermody received his bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in 1978, and his medical degree from Columbia University in 1982. He completed an internal medicine residency at Presbyterian Hospital in New York in 1985 and fellowships in infectious diseases and molecular virology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in 1988.

He has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles, reviews and chapters about his research, which is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Lamb Foundation. He currently holds five NIH grants, and his research has been continually funded by the NIH since 1987.

He has been recognized for his research accomplishments with the Ernest W. Goodpasture Faculty Research Award, the Grant W. Liddle Award for Leadership in the Promotion of Scientific Research, and an NIH MERIT Award. He is a past president of the American Society for Virology, past chair of the AAMC GREAT Group M.D./Ph.D. Section Steering Committee, and current chair of the Virology Division of the International Union of Microbiological Societies.

For more information on Dr. Dermody and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, visit www.chp.edu.

- See more at: http://www.chp.edu/news/011116-new-pediatrics-chair#sthash.Wr8mpdQv.dpuf

UPMC Passavant and UPMC Shadyside Receive Nation’s Top Ratings for Heart Surgery

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) has awarded top quality ratings to UPMC Passavant and UPMC Shadyside. UPMC Passavant received the maximum “three star” rating for coronary artery bypass grafting procedures, placing it in the top 8.8 percent of hospitals nationally. UPMC Shadyside received the same rating for aortic valve replacement procedures, placing it in the top 9.9 percent of hospitals nationally.

 

Based on a review of data that was compiled and publicly reported for the 2014 fiscal year, the three star score designates that UPMC Passavant and UPMC Shadyside are statistically better than the national average in their respective procedures.

 

“The UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute works to provide innovative cardiac care of the highest quality to patients throughout the UPMC system,” said Victor Morell, M.D., vice chairman and director of cardiovascular services, UPMC Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery. “We are proud of the dedication displayed by our physicians and staff that led to these tremendous results.”

 

The STS National Database was established to drive quality and safety improvements among cardiothoracic surgeons. It covers adult cardiac, general thoracic and congenital heart surgery.

Lunsford Named Cushing Award Recipient

L. Dade Lunsford, MD, Lars Leksell Distinguished Professor of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh and director of the UPMC Center for Image-Guided Neurosurgery, has been chosen for the 2016 Cushing Award for Technical Excellence and Innovation in Neurosurgery by the American Association of Neurological Surgery.

The award is bestowed on an AANS member for technical prowess and skill and/or innovation in the development of new procedures that have become part of the arsenal neurosurgeons use to treat disease or trauma.

In announcing the award, the AANS cited Dr. Lunsford for his “ability to improve the delivery of neurosurgical care by enhancing safety and efficacy and by making the field of neurosurgery safer, more accessible, more efficient and more effective.” The award is one of the highest recognitions bestowed upon a neurosurgeon.

Dr. Lunsford is an internationally recognized authority on stereotactic surgery, radiosurgery, and minimally invasive surgery. In 1987, he was responsible for bringing the Gamma Knife to then Presbyterian University Hospital, the first hospital in North America to offer the innovative, non-invasive, bloodless form of brain surgery. The installation of the Gamma Knife revolutionized neurosurgical care, drastically reducing hospital stays while significantly improving patient care.

In the nearly 30 years since it’s installation, more than 13,500 patients have undergone radiosurgery in the department’s Gamma Knife units. Dr. Lunsford’s team has published numerous books and more than 400 peer reviewed outcome studies, and his team has trained more than 1,700 physicians and physicists from around the world in the role, methods, and long-term outcomes of Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

Dr. Lunsford has also played a leading role in assisting Gamma Knife manufacturer Elekta develop further models of the Gamma Knife. In 2016, the latest version of the unit, The Leksell Icon®, will debut at UPMC Presbyterian.

Page 9 of 75:« First« 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 »Last »